distance

...
[Dis┬Ětance]

Distance is an amount of space between things. From a distance, it's hard to tell if someone's wearing a vampire costume or just a chic black outfit.

...

The space between two objects; the length of a line, especially the shortest line joining two points or things that are separate; measure of separation in place.

Noun
the property created by the space between two objects or points

Noun
size of the gap between two places; "the distance from New York to Chicago"; "he determined the length of the shortest line segment joining the two points"

Noun
indifference by personal withdrawal; "emotional distance"

Noun
a distant region; "I could see it in the distance"

Noun
the interval between two times; "the distance from birth to death"; "it all happened in the space of 10 minutes"

...

Noun
a remote point in time; "if that happens it will be at some distance in the future"; "at a distance of ten years he had forgotten many of the details"

Verb
go far ahead of; "He outdistanced the other runners"

Verb
keep at a distance; "we have to distance ourselves from these events in order to continue living"


n.
The space between two objects; the length of a line, especially the shortest line joining two points or things that are separate; measure of separation in place.

n.
Remoteness of place; a remote place.

n.
A space marked out in the last part of a race course.

n.
Relative space, between troops in ranks, measured from front to rear; -- contrasted with interval, which is measured from right to left.

n.
Space between two antagonists in fencing.

n.
The part of a picture which contains the representation of those objects which are the farthest away, esp. in a landscape.

n.
Ideal disjunction; discrepancy; contrariety.

n.
Length or interval of time; period, past or future, between two eras or events.

n.
The remoteness or reserve which respect requires; hence, respect; ceremoniousness.

n.
A withholding of intimacy; alienation; coldness; disagreement; variance; restraint; reserve.

n.
Remoteness in succession or relation; as, the distance between a descendant and his ancestor.

n.
The interval between two notes; as, the distance of a fourth or seventh.

v. t.
To place at a distance or remotely.

v. t.
To cause to appear as if at a distance; to make seem remote.

v. t.
To outstrip by as much as a distance (see Distance, n., 3); to leave far behind; to surpass greatly.


Distance

Dis"tance , n. [F. distance, L. distantia.] 1. The space between two objects; the length of a line, especially the shortest line joining two points or things that are separate; measure of separation in place.
Every particle attracts every other with a force . . . inversely proportioned to the square of the distance.
2. Remoteness of place; a remote place.
Easily managed from a distance.
'T is distance lends enchantment to the view.
[He] waits at distance till he hears from Cato.
3. (Racing) A space marked out in the last part of a race course.
The horse that ran the whole field out of distance.
&hand; In trotting matches under the rules of the American Association, the distance varies with the conditions of the race, being 80 yards in races of mile heaths, best two in three, and 150 yards in races of two-mile heats. At that distance from the winning post in placed the distance post. If any horse has not reached this distance post before the first horse in that heat has reached the winning post, such horse is distanced, and disqualified for cunning again during that race. 4. (Mil.) Relative space, between troops in ranks, measured from front to rear; -- contrasted with interval, which is measured from right to left. "Distance between companies in close column is twelve yards." Farrow. 5. Space between two antagonists in fencing. Shak. 6. (Painting) The part of a picture which contains the representation of those objects which are the farthest away, esp. in a landscape. &hand; In a picture, the Middle distance is the central portion between the foreground and the distance or the extreme distance. In a perspective drawing, the Point of distance is the point where the visual rays meet. 7. Ideal disjunction; discrepancy; contrariety. Locke. 8. Length or interval of time; period, past or future, between two eras or events.
Ten years' distance between one and the other.
The writings of Euclid at the distance of two thousand years.
9. The remoteness or reserve which respect requires; hence, respect; ceremoniousness.
I hope your modesty Will know what distance to the crown is due.
'T is by respect and distance that authority is upheld.
10. A withholding of intimacy; alienation; coldness; disagreement; variance; restraint; reserve.
Setting them [factions] at distance, or at least distrust amongst themselves.
On the part of Heaven, Now alienated, distance and distaste.
11. Remoteness in succession or relation; as, the distance between a descendant and his ancestor. 12. (Mus.) The interval between two notes; as, the distance of a fourth or seventh. Angular distance, the distance made at the eye by lines drawn from the eye to two objects. -- Lunar distance. See under Lunar. -- North polar distance (Astron.), the distance on the heavens of a heavenly body from the north pole. It is the complement of the declination. -- Zenith distance (Astron.), the arc on the heavens from a heavenly body to the zenith of the observer. It is the complement of the altitude. -- To keep one's distance, to stand aloof; to refrain from familiarity.
If a man makes keep my distance, the comfort is he keeps his at the same time.

Distance

Dis"tance , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Distanced ; p. pr. & vb. n. Distancing .] 1. To place at a distance or remotely.
I heard nothing thereof at Oxford, being then miles distanced thence.
2. To cause to appear as if at a distance; to make seem remote.
His peculiar art of distancing an object to aggrandize his space.
3. To outstrip by as much as a distance (see Distance, n., 3); to leave far behind; to surpass greatly.
He distanced the most skillful of his contemporaries.

The space between two objects; the length of a line, especially the shortest line joining two points or things that are separate; measure of separation in place.

To place at a distance or remotely.

...

Usage Examples

Age, like distance lends a double charm.

I perfectly understood President Obama's attitude throughout the French presidential campaign. He had no reason to distance himself from Nicolas Sarkozy. It's the basic solidarity that leaders who worked together owe to each other.

Beauty set up distance between other people and me. It warped their behavior.

Do more than is required. What is the distance between someone who achieves their goals consistently and those who spend their lives and careers merely following? The extra mile.

Be able to back up a car for a considerable distance in a straight line and back out of a driveway.

A lot of journalists like to suck up to celebrities, and then as soon as they're a safe distance away at their computers, they take shots. But that's the way society has become, especially in pop culture.

I get asked, 'How can you have such failures in your films?' Well, what else is life about? There's some sense of constant failure in something. Humor gives you a distance from it.

At least for soccer players, it comes down to a blend of two types of fitness - your base endurance, which comes from longer distance running, and your speed, which comes from sprint-based workouts.

I don't dismiss the music that I was involved with, I don't think it was a joke, I don't think it was funny or a phase, I don't think it was just something I was doing back then, to me it was who I am. It connects all the way through. I don't distance myself from any of it.

Misspelled Form

distance, sdistance, edistance, fdistance, xdistance, cdistance, sistance, eistance, fistance, xistance, cistance, dsistance, deistance, dfistance, dxistance, dcistance, duistance, d8istance, d9istance, doistance, djistance, dkistance, dustance, d8stance, d9stance, dostance, djstance, dkstance, diustance, di8stance, di9stance, diostance, dijstance, dikstance, diastance, diwstance, diestance, didstance, dixstance, dizstance, diatance, diwtance, dietance, didtance, dixtance, diztance, disatance, diswtance, disetance, disdtance, disxtance, disztance, disrtance, dis5tance, dis6tance, disytance, disgtance, disrance, dis5ance, dis6ance, disyance, disgance, distrance, dist5ance, dist6ance, distyance, distgance, distqance, distwance, distsance, distzance, distqnce, distwnce, distsnce, distznce, distaqnce, distawnce, distasnce, distaznce, distabnce, distahnce, distajnce, distamnce, dista nce, distabce, distahce, distajce, distamce, dista ce, distanbce, distanhce, distanjce, distanmce, distan ce, distanxce, distandce, distanfce, distanvce, distan ce, distanxe, distande, distanfe, distanve, distan e, distancxe, distancde, distancfe, distancve, distanc e, distancwe, distanc3e, distanc4e, distancre, distancse, distancde, distancw, distanc3, distanc4, distancr, distancs, distancd, distancew, distance3, distance4, distancer, distances, distanced.

Other Usage Examples

Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time.

A civilization is a heritage of beliefs, customs, and knowledge slowly accumulated in the course of centuries, elements difficult at times to justify by logic, but justifying themselves as paths when they lead somewhere, since they open up for man his inner distance.

I come from Montana, and in eastern Montana we have a lot of dirt between light bulbs. It is expensive trying to bring the new technologies to smaller schools to upgrade their technologies to take advantage of distance learning.

Distance doesn't exist, in fact, and neither does time. Vibrations from love or music can be felt everywhere, at all times.

I do feel like I have always, in my life, been inclined to be on the outside, walk a different path or something. Because of that, and increasingly over the years, my sense of distance from mainstream society or from the way culture works, I have a different kind of perception of it.

For time is the longest distance between two places.

A thing is mighty big when time and distance cannot shrink it.

A petty reason perhaps why novelists more and more try to keep a distance from journalists is that novelists are trying to write the truth and journalists are trying to write fiction.

Authority doesn't work without prestige, or prestige without distance.

Comments


Browse Dictionary