discipline

[dis┬Ěci┬Ěpline]

When you have discipline, you have self control. When you discipline children, you are either teaching them to be well behaved, or you are punishing and correcting them.

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The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.

Noun
training to improve strength or self-control

Noun
the act of punishing; "the offenders deserved the harsh discipline they received"

Noun
the trait of being well behaved; "he insisted on discipline among the troops"

Noun
a system of rules of conduct or method of practice; "he quickly learned the discipline of prison routine" or "for such a plan to work requires discipline";

Noun
a branch of knowledge; "in what discipline is his doctorate?"; "teachers should be well trained in their subject"; "anthropology is the study of human beings"

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Verb
punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience; "The teacher disciplined the pupils rather frequently"

Verb
train by instruction and practice; especially to teach self-control; "Parents must discipline their children"; "Is this dog trained?"


n.
The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.

n.
Training to act in accordance with established rules; accustoming to systematic and regular action; drill.

n.
Subjection to rule; submissiveness to order and control; habit of obedience.

n.
Severe training, corrective of faults; instruction by means of misfortune, suffering, punishment, etc.

n.
Correction; chastisement; punishment inflicted by way of correction and training.

n.
The subject matter of instruction; a branch of knowledge.

n.
The enforcement of methods of correction against one guilty of ecclesiastical offenses; reformatory or penal action toward a church member.

n.
Self-inflicted and voluntary corporal punishment, as penance, or otherwise; specifically, a penitential scourge.

n.
A system of essential rules and duties; as, the Romish or Anglican discipline.

v. t.
To educate; to develop by instruction and exercise; to train.

v. t.
To accustom to regular and systematic action; to bring under control so as to act systematically; to train to act together under orders; to teach subordination to; to form a habit of obedience in; to drill.

v. t.
To improve by corrective and penal methods; to chastise; to correct.

v. t.
To inflict ecclesiastical censures and penalties upon.


Discipline

Dis`ci*pline , n. [F. discipline, L. disciplina, from discipulus. See Disciple.] 1. The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.
Wife and children are a kind of discipline of humanity.
Discipline aims at the removal of bad habits and the substitution of good ones, especially those of order, regularity, and obedience.
2. Training to act in accordance with established rules; accustoming to systematic and regular action; drill.
Their wildness lose, and, quitting nature's part, Obey the rules and discipline of art.
3. Subjection to rule; submissiveness to order and control; habit of obedience.
The most perfect, who have their passions in the best discipline, are yet obliged to be constantly on their guard.
4. Severe training, corrective of faults; instruction by means of misfortune, suffering, punishment, etc.
A sharp discipline of half a century had sufficed to educate s.
5. Correction; chastisement; punishment inflicted by way of correction and training.
Giving her the discipline of the strap.
6. The subject matter of instruction; a branch of knowledge. 7. (Eccl.) The enforcement of methods of correction against one guilty of ecclesiastical offenses; reformatory or penal action toward a church member. 8. (R. C. Ch.) Self- inflicted and voluntary corporal punishment, as penance, or otherwise; specifically, a penitential scourge. 9. (Eccl.) A system of essential rules and duties; as, the Romish or Anglican discipline. Syn. -- Education; instruction; training; culture; correction; chastisement; punishment.

Discipline

Dis"ci*pline , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Disciplined ; p. pr. & vb. n. Disciplining.] [Cf. LL. disciplinarian to flog, fr. L. disciplina discipline, and F. discipliner to discipline.] 1. To educate; to develop by instruction and exercise; to train. 2. To accustom to regular and systematic action; to bring under control so as to act systematically; to train to act together under orders; to teach subordination to; to form a habit of obedience in; to drill.
Ill armed, and worse disciplined.
His mind . . . imperfectly disciplined by nature.
3. To improve by corrective and penal methods; to chastise; to correct.
Has he disciplined Aufidius soundly?
4. To inflict ecclesiastical censures and penalties upon. Syn. -- To train; form; teach; instruct; bring up; regulate; correct; chasten; chastise; punish.

The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.

To educate; to develop by instruction and exercise; to train.

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Usage Examples

Age acquires no value save through thought and discipline.

A discipline I have observed is an attitude of love and reverence to people.

I believed in studying just because I knew education was a privilege. It was the discipline of study, to get into the habit of doing something that you don't want to do.

Discipline is based on pride, on meticulous attention to details, and on mutual respect and confidence. Discipline must be a habit so ingrained that it is stronger than the excitement of the goal or the fear of failure.

Discipline strengthens the mind so that it becomes impervious to the corroding influence of fear.

Any one who wants to live in peace and freedom will be to live by toil, demonstration of high levels of discipline and tolerance for one another.

Because of their size, parents may be difficult to discipline properly.

Genius at first is little more than a great capacity for receiving discipline.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

Despite our very recent appearance on the planet, humanity combines arrogance with increasing material demands, even as we become more numerous. Our toughness is a delusion. Have we the intelligence and discipline to vigilantly guard against our tendency to grow without limit?

Affirmation without discipline is the beginning of delusion.

As a young boy, I read 'Cheaper by the Dozen' and immediately became neurotic about my use of time. It taxed me severely, but only for the next 50 years. But I think it also allowed me to discipline myself to sit in the chair and be a writer, where one of the most needed qualities is patience.

Either you think, or else others have to think for you and take power from you, pervert and discipline your natural tastes, civilize and sterilize you.

A great power has to have the discipline not only to go when necessary but to know when not to go. Getting involved in ethnic, religious civil wars is a recipe for disaster.

Gymnastics taught me everything - life lessons, responsibility and discipline and respect.

Discipline is the soul of an army. It makes small numbers formidable procures success to the weak, and esteem to all.

Discipline is the bridge between goals and accomplishment.

Discipline is wisdom and vice versa.

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