dictate

[Dic┬Ětate]

When you dictate something, you are giving orders acting a bit like a dictator.

...

To tell or utter so that another may write down; to inspire; to compose; as, to dictate a letter to an amanuensis.

Noun
a guiding principle; "the dictates of reason"

Noun
an authoritative rule

Verb
say out loud for the purpose of recording; "He dictated a report to his secretary"

Verb
issue commands or orders for

Verb
rule as a dictator

...

v. t.
To tell or utter so that another may write down; to inspire; to compose; as, to dictate a letter to an amanuensis.

v. t.
To say; to utter; to communicate authoritatively; to deliver (a command) to a subordinate; to declare with authority; to impose; as, to dictate the terms of a treaty; a general dictates orders to his troops.

v. i.
To speak as a superior; to command; to impose conditions (on).

v. i.
To compose literary works; to tell what shall be written or said by another.

v. t.
A statement delivered with authority; an order; a command; an authoritative rule, principle, or maxim; a prescription; as, listen to the dictates of your conscience; the dictates of the gospel.


Dictate

Dic"tate , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dictated; p. pr. & vb. n. Dictating.] [L. dictatus, p. p. of dictare, freq. of dicere to say. See Diction, and cf. Dight.] 1. To tell or utter so that another may write down; to inspire; to compose; as, to dictate a letter to an amanuensis.
The mind which dictated the Iliad.
Pages dictated by the Holy Spirit.
2. To say; to utter; to communicate authoritatively; to deliver (a command) to a subordinate; to declare with authority; to impose; as, to dictate the terms of a treaty; a general dictates orders to his troops.
Whatsoever is dictated to us by God must be believed.
Syn. -- To suggest; prescribe; enjoin; command; point out; urge; admonish.

Dictate

Dic"tate, v. i. 1. To speak as a superior; to command; to impose conditions (on).
Who presumed to dictate to the sovereign.
2. To compose literary works; to tell what shall be written or said by another.
Sylla could not skill of letters, and therefore knew not how to dictate.

Dictate

Dic"tate , n. [L. dictatum. See Dictate, v. t.] A statement delivered with authority; an order; a command; an authoritative rule, principle, or maxim; a prescription; as, listen to the dictates of your conscience; the dictates of the gospel.
I credit what the Grecian dictates say.
Syn. -- Command; injunction; direction suggestion; impulse; admonition.

To tell or utter so that another may write down; to inspire; to compose; as, to dictate a letter to an amanuensis.

To speak as a superior; to command; to impose conditions (on).

A statement delivered with authority; an order; a command; an authoritative rule, principle, or maxim; a prescription; as, listen to the dictates of your conscience; the dictates of the gospel.

...

Usage Examples

I really feel like life will dictate itself. You should allow it to unfold as naturally as possible. Just go with the flow. When you're really desperate, you say a few prayers and hope for the best. That's the way I've always lived my life.

What if I couldn't handle people's opinions of me? I know that shouldn't dictate a person's degree of peace or happiness in life, but the problem is, I chose a business saturated in judgment.

I've learned through experience that life is never that bad. The secret is just paying attention to how you feel and not letting anyone else dictate what in your heart you know is right.

My faith helps me understand that circumstances don't dictate my happiness, my inner peace.

Man doesn't dictate what you do or how you do it. If you believe in God, believe in God have your faith in him. That's where my faith lies.

Man wants to live, but it is useless to hope that this desire will dictate all his actions.

The way that a handful of corporations in Los Angeles dictate how our stories are told creates a real poverty of imagination and it's a big problem.

I'd like to think Helen very much understood what it was to be disadvantaged in the medical field. And that that was something that she never let dictate her choices.

Misspelled Form

dictate, sdictate, edictate, fdictate, xdictate, cdictate, sictate, eictate, fictate, xictate, cictate, dsictate, deictate, dfictate, dxictate, dcictate, duictate, d8ictate, d9ictate, doictate, djictate, dkictate, ductate, d8ctate, d9ctate, doctate, djctate, dkctate, diuctate, di8ctate, di9ctate, dioctate, dijctate, dikctate, dixctate, didctate, difctate, divctate, di ctate, dixtate, didtate, diftate, divtate, di tate, dicxtate, dicdtate, dicftate, dicvtate, dic tate, dicrtate, dic5tate, dic6tate, dicytate, dicgtate, dicrate, dic5ate, dic6ate, dicyate, dicgate, dictrate, dict5ate, dict6ate, dictyate, dictgate, dictqate, dictwate, dictsate, dictzate, dictqte, dictwte, dictste, dictzte, dictaqte, dictawte, dictaste, dictazte, dictarte, dicta5te, dicta6te, dictayte, dictagte, dictare, dicta5e, dicta6e, dictaye, dictage, dictatre, dictat5e, dictat6e, dictatye, dictatge, dictatwe, dictat3e, dictat4e, dictatre, dictatse, dictatde, dictatw, dictat3, dictat4, dictatr, dictats, dictatd, dictatew, dictate3, dictate4, dictater, dictates, dictated.

Other Usage Examples

No man has the right to dictate what other men should perceive, create or produce, but all should be encouraged to reveal themselves, their perceptions and emotions, and to build confidence in the creative spirit.

I know many writers who first dictate passages, then polish what they have dictated. I speak, then I polish - occasionally I do windows.

No emperor has the power to dictate to the heart.

We cannot have that relationship if we only dictate or threaten and condemn those who disagree.

In better times the religion of the tribe or state has nothing in common with the private and foreign superstitions or magical rites that savage terror may dictate to the individual.

They become the keepers of the mystery. They place themselves between the communicants of the religion, and the immediate experience. And then they dictate the terms on which you can have contact with this wonderful mystery. We don't dictate those terms.

Science and technology multiply around us. To an increasing extent they dictate the languages in which we speak and think. Either we use those languages, or we remain mute.

There is so much temptation to hold on to my career even more now. To try to micromanage and dictate every little aspect. But that's not how I want to do things anymore. I'm thinking about how can I trust God more. How can I surrender more? How can I bring him more glory? It's a fight. But it's one I'm going to keep fighting.

Comments


Browse Dictionary