departure

[De*par┬Ěture]

A departure is the act of leaving somewhere. Think about an airport that has departure gates for outgoing passengers and an arrival area for people flying in.

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Division; separation; putting away.

Noun
act of departing

Noun
euphemistic expressions for death; "thousands mourned his passing"

Noun
a variation that deviates from the standard or norm; "the deviation from the mean"


n.
Division; separation; putting away.

n.
Separation or removal from a place; the act or process of departing or going away.

n.
Removal from the present life; death; decease.

n.
Deviation or abandonment, as from or of a rule or course of action, a plan, or a purpose.

n.
The desertion by a party to any pleading of the ground taken by him in his last antecedent pleading, and the adoption of another.

n.
The distance due east or west which a person or ship passes over in going along an oblique line.


Departure

De*par"ture , n. [From Depart.] 1. Division; separation; putting away. [Obs.]
No other remedy . . . but absolute departure.
2. Separation or removal from a place; the act or process of departing or going away.
Departure from this happy place.
3. Removal from the present life; death; decease.
The time of my departure is at hand.
His timely departure . . . barred him from the knowledge of his son's miseries.
4. Deviation or abandonment, as from or of a rule or course of action, a plan, or a purpose.
Any departure from a national standard.
5. (Law) The desertion by a party to any pleading of the ground taken by him in his last antecedent pleading, and the adoption of another. Bouvier. 6. (Nav. & Surv.) The distance due east or west which a person or ship passes over in going along an oblique line. &hand; Since the meridians sensibly converge, the departure in navigation is not measured from the beginning nor from the end of the ship's course, but is regarded as the total easting or westing made by the ship or person as he travels over the course. To take a departure (Nav. & Surv.), to ascertain, usually by taking bearings from a landmark, the position of a vessel at the beginning of a voyage as a point from which to begin her dead reckoning; as, the ship took her departure from Sandy Hook. Syn. -- Death; demise; release. See Death.

Division; separation; putting away.

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Usage Examples

The most amazing thing to me about the sea is the tide. A harbour like St. Ives is totally transformed in a very short space of time by the arrival or departure of the sea.

I have always detested any departure from reality, an attitude which I relate to my mother's poor mental health.

Change is certain. Peace is followed by disturbances departure of evil men by their return. Such recurrences should not constitute occasions for sadness but realities for awareness, so that one may be happy in the interim.

In this life struggle, here I am among you fully cognizant that a true believer has no fear of what God has ordained for him. Those who are visited by fear live only for their present, under the illusion that the world began with them and will end with their departure.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

The only certain freedom's in departure.

The great defense against the air menace is to attack the enemy's aircraft as near as possible to their point of departure.

Justice is itself the great standing policy of civil society and any eminent departure from it, under any circumstances, lies under the suspicion of being no policy at all.

Since the departure of good old-fashioned entertainers the re-emergence of somebody who wants to be an entertainer has unfortunately become a synonym for camp. I don't think I'm camper than any other person who felt at home on stage, and felt more at home on stage than he did offstage.

The point of departure of the process to which we wish to contribute is the fact that war is the natural reaction of human nature in the savage state, while peace is the result of acquired characteristics.

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