curb

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[Curb]

A stock exchange in New York

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To bend or curve

Noun
the act of restraining power or action or limiting excess; "his common sense is a bridle to his quick temper"

Noun
a stock exchange in New York

Noun
an edge between a sidewalk and a roadway consisting of a line of curbstones (usually forming part of a gutter)

Noun
a horse''s bit with an attached chain or strap to check the horse

Verb
place restrictions on; "curtail drinking in school"

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Verb
to put down by force or authority; "suppress a nascent uprising"; "stamp down on littering"; "conquer one''s desires"

Verb
keep to the curb; "curb your dogs"

Verb
lessen the intensity of; temper; hold in restraint; hold or keep within limits; "moderate your alcohol intake"; "hold your tongue"; "hold your temper"; "control your anger"


v. t.
To bend or curve

v. t.
To guide and manage, or restrain, as with a curb; to bend to one's will; to subject; to subdue; to restrain; to confine; to keep in check.

v. t.
To furnish wich a curb, as a well; also, to restrain by a curb, as a bank of earth.

v. i.
To bend; to crouch; to cringe.

n.
That which curbs, restrains, or subdues; a check or hindrance; esp., a chain or strap attached to the upper part of the branches of a bit, and capable of being drawn tightly against the lower jaw of the horse.

n.
An assemblage of three or more pieces of timber, or a metal member, forming a frame around an opening, and serving to maintain the integrity of that opening; also, a ring of stone serving a similar purpose, as at the eye of a dome.

n.
A frame or wall round the mouth of a well; also, a frame within a well to prevent the earth caving in.

n.
A curbstone.

n.
A swelling on the back part of the hind leg of a horse, just behind the lowest part of the hock joint, generally causing lameness.


Curb

Curb (k?rb), v. t. [imp. & p.p. Curbed (k?rbd); p. pr. & vb. n. Curbing.] [F. courber to bend, curve, L.curvare, fr. curvus bent, curved; cf. Gr. curved. Cf. Curve.] 1. To bend or curve [Obs.]
Crooked and curbed lines.
2. To guide and manage, or restrain, as with a curb; to bend to one's will; to subject; to subdue; to restrain; to confine; to keep in check.
Part wield their arms, part curb the foaming steed.
Where pinching want must curbthy warm desires.
3. To furnish wich a curb, as a well; also, to restrain by a curb, as a bank of earth.

Curb

Curb, v. i. To bend; to crouch; to cringe. [Obs.]
Virtue itself of vice must pardon beg, Yea, curb and woo for leave to do him good.

Curb

Curb, n. 1. That which curbs, restrains, or subdues; a check or hindbrance; esp., a chain or strap attached to the upper part of the branches of a bit, and capable of being drawn tightly against the lower jaw of the horse.
He that before ran in the pastures wild Felt the stiff curb control his angry jaws.
By these men, religion,that should be The curb, is made the spur of tyranny.
2. (Arch.) An assemblage of three or more pieces of timber, or a metal member, forming a frame around an opening, and serving to maintain the integrity of that opening; also, a ring of stone serving a similar purpose, as at the eye of a dome. 3. A frame or wall round the mouth of a well; also, a frame within a well to prevent the earth caving in. 4. A curbstone. 5. (Far.) A swelling on the back part of the hind leg of a horse, just behind the lowest part of the hock joint, generally causing lameness. James Law. Curb bit, a stiff bit having branches by which a leverage is obtained upon the jaws of horse. Knight. -- Curb pins (Horology), the pins on the regulator which restrain the hairspring. -- Curb plate (Arch.), a plate serving the purpose of a curb. -- Deck curb. See under Deck.

To bend or curve

To bend; to crouch; to cringe.

That which curbs, restrains, or subdues; a check or hindbrance; esp., a chain or strap attached to the upper part of the branches of a bit, and capable of being drawn tightly against the lower jaw of the horse.

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Usage Examples

But curb thou the high spirit in thy breast, for gentle ways are best, and keep aloof from sharp contentions.

What people fear most about tragedy is its randomness - a taxi cab jumps the curb and hits a pedestrian, a gun misfires and kills a bystander. Better to have some rational cause and effect between incident and injury. And if cause and effect aren't possible, better that there at least be some reward for all the suffering.

Misspelled Form

curb, xcurb, dcurb, fcurb, vcurb, curb, xurb, durb, furb, vurb, urb, cxurb, cdurb, cfurb, cvurb, c urb, cyurb, c7urb, c8urb, ciurb, cjurb, cyrb, c7rb, c8rb, cirb, cjrb, cuyrb, cu7rb, cu8rb, cuirb, cujrb, cuerb, cu4rb, cu5rb, cutrb, cufrb, cueb, cu4b, cu5b, cutb, cufb, cureb, cur4b, cur5b, curtb, curfb, curvb, curgb, curhb, curnb, cur b, curv, curg, curh, curn, cur , curbv, curbg, curbh, curbn, curb .

Other Usage Examples

Now I think one of the reasons why religion developed in the way that it did over the centuries was precisely to curb this murderous bent that we have as human beings.

All respect for the office of the presidency aside, I assumed that the obvious and unadulterated decline of freedom and constitutional sovereignty, not to mention the efforts to curb the power of judicial review, spoke for itself.

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