course

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[Course]

The noun course can refer to a series of lectures, discussions, or other lessons in a particular subject. To graduate from high school, you have to take certain courses in English, social studies, math, and science. Naturally, you want to pass them!

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The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage.

Noun
a mode of action; "if you persist in that course you will surely fail"; "once a nation is embarked on a course of action it becomes extremely difficult for any retraction to take place"

Noun
education imparted in a series of lessons or class meetings; "he took a course in basket weaving"; "flirting is not unknown in college classes"

Noun
facility consisting of a circumscribed area of land or water laid out for a sport; "the course had only nine holes"; "the course was less than a mile"

Noun
(construction) a layer of masonry; "a course of bricks"

Noun
part of a meal served at one time; "she prepared a three course meal"

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Noun
a connected series of events or actions or developments; "the government took a firm course"; "historians can only point out those lines for which evidence is available"

Noun
general line of orientation; "the river takes a southern course"; "the northeastern trend of the coast"

Noun
a line or route along which something travels or moves; "the hurricane demolished houses in its path"; "the track of an animal"; "the course of the river"

Verb
hunt with hounds; "He often courses hares"

Verb
move along, of liquids; "Water flowed into the cave"; "the Missouri feeds into the Mississippi"

Verb
move swiftly through or over; "ships coursing the Atlantic"

Adverb
as might be expected; "naturally, the lawyer sent us a huge bill"


n.
The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage.

n.
The ground or path traversed; track; way.

n.
Motion, considered as to its general or resultant direction or to its goal; line progress or advance.

n.
Progress from point to point without change of direction; any part of a progress from one place to another, which is in a straight line, or on one direction; as, a ship in a long voyage makes many courses; a course measured by a surveyor between two stations; also, a progress without interruption or rest; a heat; as, one course of a race.

n.
Motion considered with reference to manner; or derly progress; procedure in a certain line of thought or action; as, the course of an argument.

n.
Customary or established sequence of events; recurrence of events according to natural laws.

n.
Method of procedure; manner or way of conducting; conduct; behavior.

n.
A series of motions or acts arranged in order; a succession of acts or practices connectedly followed; as, a course of medicine; a course of lectures on chemistry.

n.
The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.

n.
That part of a meal served at one time, with its accompaniments.

n.
A continuous level range of brick or stones of the same height throughout the face or faces of a building.

n.
The lowest sail on any mast of a square-rigged vessel; as, the fore course, main course, etc.

n.
The menses.

v. t.
To run, hunt, or chase after; to follow hard upon; to pursue.

v. t.
To cause to chase after or pursue game; as, to course greyhounds after deer.

v. t.
To run through or over.

v. i.
To run as in a race, or in hunting; to pursue the sport of coursing; as, the sportsmen coursed over the flats of Lancashire.

v. i.
To move with speed; to race; as, the blood courses through the veins.


Course

Course (k?rs), n. [F. cours, course, L. cursus, fr. currere to run. See Current.] 1. The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage.
And when we had finished our course from Tyre, we came to Ptolemais.
2. THe ground or path traversed; track; way.
The same horse also run the round course at Newmarket.
3. Motion, considered as to its general or resultant direction or to its goal; line progress or advance.
A light by which the Argive squadron steers Their silent course to Ilium's well known shore.
Westward the course of empire takes its way.
4. Progress from point to point without change of direction; any part of a progress from one place to another, which is in a straight line, or on one direction; as, a ship in a long voyage makes many courses; a course measured by a surveyor between two stations; also, a progress without interruption or rest; a heat; as, one course of a race. 5. Motion considered with reference to manner; or derly progress; procedure in a certain line of thought or action; as, the course of an argument.
The course of true love never did run smooth.
6. Customary or established sequence of evants; re currence of events according to natural laws.
By course of nature and of law.
Day and night, Seedtime and harvest, heat and hoary frost, Shall hold their course.
7. Method of procedure; manner or way of conducting; conduct; behavior.
My lord of York commends the plot and the general course of the action.
By perseverance in the course prescribed.
You hold your course without remorse.
8. A series of motions or acts arranged in order; a succession of acts or practices connectedly followed; as, a course of medicine; a course of lectures on chemistry. 9. The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.
He appointed . . . the courses of the priests
10. That part of a meal served at one time, with its accompaniments.
He [Goldsmith] wore fine clothes, gave dinners of several courses, paid court to venal beauties.
11. (Arch.) A continuous level range of brick or stones of the same height throughout the face or faces of a building. Gwilt. 12. (Naut.) The lowest sail on any mast of a square-rigged vessel; as, the fore course, main course, etc. 13. pl. (Physiol.) The menses. In course, in regular succession. -- Of course, by consequence; as a matter of course; in regular or natural order. -- In the course of, at same time or times during. "In the course of human events." T. Jefferson. Syn. -- Way; road; route; passage; race; series; succession; manner; method; mode; career; progress.

Course

Course, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Coursed (k?rst)); p. pr. & vb. n. Coursing.] 1. To run, hunt, or chase after; to follow hard upon; to pursue.
We coursed him at the heels.
2. To cause to chase after or pursue game; as, to course greyhounds after deer. 3. To run through or over.
The bounding steed courses the dusty plain.

Course

Course, v. i. 1. To run as in a race, or in hunting; to pursue the sport of coursing; as, the sportsmen coursed over the flats of Lancashire. 2. To move with speed; to race; as, the blood courses through the veins. Shak.

The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage.

To run, hunt, or chase after; to follow hard upon; to pursue.

To run as in a race, or in hunting; to pursue the sport of coursing; as, the sportsmen coursed over the flats of Lancashire.

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Usage Examples

Art is like a border of flowers along the course of civilization.

A painstaking course in qualitative and quantitative analysis by John Wing gave me an appreciation of the need for, and beauty of, accurate measurement.

And of course I've got kids of my own now, and they love me being in the Harry Potter films. I'm now part of a phenomenon. You become incredibly cool to your kids, and you get a young fan base. So you became the cool dad at school. You're suddenly hip.

A Nicklaus Design golf course is done by the guys in my company that I work with, that have been trained in my vision, and they do what they think I might do. They might come in the office and ask me questions and I'd certainly answer their questions, but I'm not involved in the site visits or anything else.

A small body of determined spirits fired by an unquenchable faith in their mission can alter the course of history.

And of course Marc Cherry heightens it and makes it hilarious. But there's so many universal themes in the show, and he made it so funny. We knew he was onto something if he could keep it up and, thankfully, he did.

Although I do use some of my psychology training in comedy, but it's more like pop psychology, not a course of treatment or anything. To me, it's more like social intelligence.

A civilization is a heritage of beliefs, customs, and knowledge slowly accumulated in the course of centuries, elements difficult at times to justify by logic, but justifying themselves as paths when they lead somewhere, since they open up for man his inner distance.

Misspelled Form

course, xcourse, dcourse, fcourse, vcourse, course, xourse, dourse, fourse, vourse, ourse, cxourse, cdourse, cfourse, cvourse, c ourse, ciourse, c9ourse, c0ourse, cpourse, clourse, ciurse, c9urse, c0urse, cpurse, clurse, coiurse, co9urse, co0urse, copurse, colurse, coyurse, co7urse, co8urse, coiurse, cojurse, coyrse, co7rse, co8rse, coirse, cojrse, couyrse, cou7rse, cou8rse, couirse, coujrse, couerse, cou4rse, cou5rse, coutrse, coufrse, couese, cou4se, cou5se, coutse, coufse, courese, cour4se, cour5se, courtse, courfse, courase, courwse, courese, courdse, courxse, courzse, courae, courwe, couree, courde, courxe, courze, coursae, courswe, coursee, coursde, coursxe, coursze, courswe, cours3e, cours4e, coursre, coursse, coursde, coursw, cours3, cours4, coursr, courss, coursd, coursew, course3, course4, courser, courses, coursed.

Other Usage Examples

A band is not a marriage. There are no oaths of allegiance. If you feel your life will be better served by splitting up the group, you've got to do it - but of course it does cause problems.

And of course I didn't make any money from stand up for years, so I had temp jobs. That was the way I made money.

And this President wakes up every morning, looks out across America and is proud to announce, 'It could be worse.' It could be worse? Is that what it means to be an American? It could be worse? Of course not. What defines us as Americans is our unwavering conviction that we know it must be better.

All three networks have always had a morning show but now cable of course is taking some of that audience away and a variety of other things, probably the Internet as well.

All those authors there, most of whom of course I've never met. That's the poetry side, that's the prose side, that's the fishing and miscellaneous behind me. You get an affection for books that you've enjoyed.

Against my will, in the course of my travels, the belief that everything worth knowing was known at Cambridge gradually wore off. In this respect my travels were very useful to me.

All that is needed to set us definitely on the road to a Fascist society is war. It will of course be a modified form of Fascism at first.

A man may speak very well in the House of Commons, and fail very completely in the House of Lords. There are two distinct styles requisite: I intend, in the course of my career, if I have time, to give a specimen of both.

And of course there's so much music in and around our family. I had a piano during Christmas because it's obviously useful through the season. There are so many people, songwriters, who are around.

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