costume

[Cos┬Ětume`]

A costume is a set of clothes you wear when you want to dress up like another person. You might wear a witch's costume to go trick or treating on Halloween, or put on a George Washington costume to reenact a scene from the American Revolution in a play.

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Dress in general; esp., the distinctive style of dress of a people, class, or period.

Noun
the attire worn in a play or at a fancy dress ball; "he won the prize for best costume"

Noun
the attire characteristic of a country or a time or a social class; "he wore his national costume"

Noun
unusual or period attire not characteristic of or appropriate to the time and place; "in spite of the heat he insisted on his woolen costume"

Noun
the prevalent fashion of dress (including accessories and hair style as well as garments)

Verb
dress in a costume; "We dressed up for Halloween as pumpkins"

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Verb
furnish with costumes; as for a film or play


n.
Dress in general; esp., the distinctive style of dress of a people, class, or period.

n.
Such an arrangement of accessories, as in a picture, statue, poem, or play, as is appropriate to the time, place, or other circumstances represented or described.

n.
A character dress, used at fancy balls or for dramatic purposes.


Costume

Cos"tume` (k?s"t?m` ∨ k?s-t?m"), n. [F. costume, It. costume custom, dress, fr. L. consuetumen (not found), for consuetudo custom. See Custom, and cf. Consuetude.] 1. Dress in general; esp., the distinctive style of dress of a people, class, or period. 2. Such an arrangement of accessories, as in a picture, statue, poem, or play, as is appropriate to the time, place, or other circumstances represented or described.
I began last night to read Walter Scott's Lay of the Last Minstrel . . . .I was extremely delighted with the poetical beauty of some parts . . . .The costume, too, is admirable.
3. A character dress, used at fancy balls or for dramatic purposes.

Dress in general; esp., the distinctive style of dress of a people, class, or period.

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Usage Examples

I put the costume on and said 'It's not very comfortable, but it looks amazing,' so it's all good.

It was amazing that during rehearsals, without any of the costume on, the character was there complete. It just happened. Half the time, I didn't know I was doing it.

I'm very much into the costuming of any character that I portray and it's one of the great things about making movies is it's a collaborative art form so you get all these artists who are looking specifically about for this instance your character's costume and what that might tell about your character.

If death meant just leaving the stage long enough to change costume and come back as a new character, would you slow down? Or speed up?

No matter how many modern parts I do, people still refer to me as Mrs. Costume Drama. Fight Club is a studio pic, and I've done very few of those. I've got a feeling it's going to change things for me.

Period costume films are fun to discover, but they're not relatable. It's more, 'Wow, that's cool - did it really look like that back then?' Whereas with a comedy, you're like, 'Yeah, that's me, that's my friends.' No matter what, I want people to relate.

You cannot climb the ladder of success dressed in the costume of failure.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

Doctors, dressed up in one professional costume or another, have been in busy practice since the earliest records of every culture on earth. It is hard to think of a more dependable or enduring occupation, harder still to imagine any future events leading to its extinction.

The costume that I wear on the show is a little snug and doesn't leave a whole lot to the imagination. I don't have a problem with it because of the way this character's been written.

There's no mystery to it. Nothing more complicated than learning lines and putting on a costume.

I enjoyed studying costume, learning about the corsetry and the historical context of fashion. I never had any real intention of being a costume designer.

I'd love to go to fashion week! I'm learning more about designers, thanks to 'Pretty Little Liars'' costume designer, Mandi Line.

All through my life what I've loved doing is watching movies. I love the escapism of film, I love stories. So it is incredible to be able to be in them as much as I am, to see them from the first stitch in a costume to the end product.

Women: You can't live with them, and you can't get them to dress up in a skimpy little Nazi costume and beat you with a warm squash or something.

At school, there was an annual school disco and I'd be standing in my bedroom wondering what to wear for hours on end. Eventually I'd arrive at a decision that was just the most ridiculous costume you could have ever devised - I think it was probably knitted Christmas jumpers on top of buttoned-up white shirts.

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