corner

[Cor┬Ěner]

Corners are everywhere. Two perpendicular lines form a corner. Rooms and streets have corners too. If a child misbehaves in class, the teacher might make him stand in the corner.

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The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal.

Noun
the intersection of two streets; "standing on the corner watching all the girls go by"

Noun
(architecture) solid exterior angle of a building; especially one formed by a cornerstone

Noun
an interior angle formed be two meeting walls; "a piano was in one corner of the room"

Noun
the point where two lines meet or intersect; "the corners of a rectangle"

Noun
a place off to the side of an area; "he tripled to the rightfield corner"; "he glanced out of the corner of his eye"

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Noun
a remote area; "in many corners of the world they still practice slavery"

Noun
the point where three areas or surfaces meet or intersect; "the corners of a cube"

Noun
a projecting part that is corner-shaped; "he knocked off the corners"

Noun
a small concavity

Noun
a predicament from which a skillful or graceful escape is impossible; "his lying got him into a tight corner"

Noun
a temporary monopoly on a kind of commercial trade; "a corner on the silver market"

Verb
turn a corner; "the car corners"

Verb
force a person or an animal into a position from which he cannot escape

Verb
gain control over; "corner the gold market"


n.
The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal.

n.
The space in the angle between converging lines or walls which meet in a point; as, the chimney corner.

n.
An edge or extremity; the part farthest from the center; hence, any quarter or part.

n.
A secret or secluded place; a remote or out of the way place; a nook.

n.
Direction; quarter.

n.
The state of things produced by a combination of persons, who buy up the whole or the available part of any stock or species of property, which compels those who need such stock or property to buy of them at their own price; as, a corner in a railway stock.

v. t.
To drive into a corner.

v. t.
To drive into a position of great difficulty or hopeless embarrassment; as, to corner a person in argument.

v. t.
To get command of (a stock, commodity, etc.), so as to be able to put one's own price on it; as, to corner the shares of a railroad stock; to corner petroleum.


Corner

Cor"ner (k?r"n?r), n. [OF. corniere, cornier, LL. cornerium, corneria, fr. L. cornu horn, end, point. See Horn.] 1. The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal. 2. The space in the angle between converging lines or walls which meet in a point; as, the chimney corner. 3. An edge or extremity; the part farthest from the center; hence, any quarter or part.
From the four corners of the earth they come.
4. A secret or secluded place; a remote or out of the way place; a nook.
This thing was not done in a corner.
5. Direction; quarter.
Sits the wind in that corner!
6. The state of things produced by a combination of persons, who buy up the whole or the available part of any stock or species of property, which compels those who need such stock or property to buy of them at their own price; as, a corner in a railway stock. [Broker's Cant] Corner stone, the stone which lies at the corner of two walls, and unites them; the principal stone; especially, the stone which forms the corner of the foundation of an edifice; hence, that which is fundamental importance or indispensable. "A prince who regarded uniformity of faith as the corner stone of his government." Prescott. -- Corner tooth, one of the four teeth which come in a horse's mouth at the age of four years and a half, one on each side of the upper and of the lower jaw, between the middle teeth and the tushes.

Corner

Cor"ner, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Cornered (-n?rd);p. pr. & vb. n. Cornering.] 1. To drive into a corner. 2. To drive into a position of great difficaulty or hopeless embarrassment; as, to corner a person in argument. 3. To get command of (a stock, commodity, etc.), so as to be able to put one's own price on it; as, to corner the shares of a railroad stock; to corner petroleum.

The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal.

To drive into a corner.

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Usage Examples

If you've got to my age, you've probably had your heart broken many times. So it's not that difficult to unpack a bit of grief from some little corner of your heart and cry over it.

Amazement awaits us at every corner.

Even at the United Nations, where legend has it that the building was designed so that there could be no corner offices, the expanse of glass in individual offices is said to be a dead giveaway as to rank. Five windows are excellent, one window not so great.

Behind every small business, there's a story worth knowing. All the corner shops in our towns and cities, the restaurants, cleaners, gyms, hair salons, hardware stores - these didn't come out of nowhere.

A lot of people think Formula One isn't a sport because everyone drives a car when they go to work in the morning. But we're pulling up to six G on a corner or during breaking, which is almost like being a fighter pilot. So we have to do a lot of work on our neck muscles.

I am going to miss that time when you take that corner better than anybody else could have taken it on that lap or you do that great qualifying lap or you make that great pass or you bring a crippled car home.

I was one those kids who had books on them. Before weddings, Bar Mitzvahs, funerals and anything else where you're actually meant to not be reading, my family would frisk me and take the book away. If they didn't find it by this point in the procedure, I would be sitting over in that corner completely unnoticed just reading my book.

Honest to God, all my life I have had such a fear of spiders. In fact, I use to have a reoccurring dream about one. Very clearly, it was black with a red head. It would sit up in the corner of the bedroom and when it started getting closer, I would wake up in a panic.

Hats have been my thing pretty much my whole life but finance has not. I would go to the corner store and buy really cheap baseball style caps and wear those to school.

Misspelled Form

corner, xcorner, dcorner, fcorner, vcorner, corner, xorner, dorner, forner, vorner, orner, cxorner, cdorner, cforner, cvorner, c orner, ciorner, c9orner, c0orner, cporner, clorner, cirner, c9rner, c0rner, cprner, clrner, coirner, co9rner, co0rner, coprner, colrner, coerner, co4rner, co5rner, cotrner, cofrner, coener, co4ner, co5ner, cotner, cofner, corener, cor4ner, cor5ner, cortner, corfner, corbner, corhner, corjner, cormner, cor ner, corber, corher, corjer, cormer, cor er, cornber, cornher, cornjer, cornmer, corn er, cornwer, corn3er, corn4er, cornrer, cornser, cornder, cornwr, corn3r, corn4r, cornrr, cornsr, corndr, cornewr, corne3r, corne4r, cornerr, cornesr, cornedr, corneer, corne4r, corne5r, cornetr, cornefr, cornee, corne4, corne5, cornet, cornef, cornere, corner4, corner5, cornert, cornerf.

Other Usage Examples

'Lucky' is for laughs, and there's really nothing funny that I'm doing on 'Dexter.' I think more than anything, both comment on the fact that anybody is capable of anything. Just because they are the shy guy in the corner doesn't mean that they are a harmless little bunny.

All great deeds and all great thoughts have a ridiculous beginning. Great works are often born on a street corner or in a restaurant's revolving door.

Call it loyalty, call it what you want, but I suppose I've got people up here who I'm really tight with, we've made a lot of great bonds over the last few years and I've got people in my corner I can trust.

I stand before you as the governor of Texas but also stand before you the son of two tenant farmers. Ray Perry who came home after 35 bombing missions over Europe to work his little corner of land out there and Amelia who made sure that my sister Milla and I had everything that we needed, included hand sewing my clothes until I went off to college.

I'm not eager to jump into marriage again. I'm in the corner right now, wearing my dunce cap. That area is obviously a nightmare.

'The Panorama' is also the last place anywhere in New York where the World Trade Center still stands, whole, as it stood in the early morning of September 11. I can also see the corner where I saw the first tower fall and howled out loud. Seeing the buildings again here is uplifting, healing.

I will not leave a corner of my consciousness covered up, but saturate myself with the strange and extraordinary new conditions of this life, and it will all refine itself into poetry later on.

If I was sad or afraid, I would sit in a corner and sing. If I was happy I would jump into the middle of the room and sing. It was how I expressed my emotions.

I was a mimic when I was a child. I mimicked the teacher and made friends that way, actually. That was a very subversive activity, because I was a goody-goody who never got in trouble. But if I went off in the corner and mimicked the teacher, people loved it.

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