copy

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[copĀ·y]

A copy is a reproduction of something it looks identical to the original. You might ask your sister to make a copy of your nephew's adorable painting so you can hang it on your fridge.

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An abundance or plenty of anything.

Noun
a secondary representation of an original; "she made a copy of the designer dress"

Noun
matter to be printed; exclusive of graphical materials

Noun
a reproduction of a written record (e.g. of a legal or school record)

Noun
material suitable for a journalistic account; "catastrophes make good copy"

Verb
make a replica of; "copy that drawing"; "re-create a picture by Rembrandt"

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Verb
biology: reproduce or make an exact copy of; "replicate the cell"; "copy the genetic information"

Verb
reproduce someone''s behavior or looks; "The mime imitated the passers-by"; "Children often copy their parents or older siblings"

Verb
copy down as is; "The students were made to copy the alphabet over and over"


n.
An abundance or plenty of anything.

n.
An imitation, transcript, or reproduction of an original work; as, a copy of a letter, an engraving, a painting, or a statue.

n.
An individual book, or a single set of books containing the works of an author; as, a copy of the Bible; a copy of the works of Addison.

n.
That which is to be imitated, transcribed, or reproduced; a pattern, model, or example; as, his virtues are an excellent copy for imitation.

n.
Manuscript or printed matter to be set up in type; as, the printers are calling for more copy.

n.
A writing paper of a particular size. Same as Bastard. See under Paper.

n.
Copyhold; tenure; lease.

n.
To make a copy or copies of; to write; print, engrave, or paint after an original; to duplicate; to reproduce; to transcribe; as, to copy a manuscript, inscription, design, painting, etc.; -- often with out, sometimes with off.

n.
To imitate; to attempt to resemble, as in manners or course of life.

v. i.
To make a copy or copies; to imitate.

v. i.
To yield a duplicate or transcript; as, the letter did not copy well.


Copy

Cop"y , n.; pl. Copies . [F. copie, fr. L. copia abundance, number, LL. also, a transcript; co- + the root of opes riches. See Opulent, and cf. Copious.] 1. An abundance or plenty of anything. [Obs.]
She was blessed with no more copy of wit, but to serve his humor thus.
2. An imitation, transcript, or reproduction of an original work; as, a copy of a letter, an engraving, a painting, or a statue.
I have not the vanity to think my copy equal to the original.
3. An individual book, or a single set of books containing the works of an author; as, a copy of the Bible; a copy of the works of Addison. 4. That which is to be imitated, transcribed, or reproduced; a pattern, model, or example; as, his virtues are an excellent copy for imitation.
Let him first learn to write, after a copy, all the letters.
5. (print.) Manuscript or printed matter to be set up in type; as, the printers are calling for more copy. 6. A writing paper f a particular size. Same as Bastard. See under Paper. 7. Copyhold; tenure; lease. [Obs.] Shak. Copy book, a book in which copies are written or printed for learners to imitate. -- Examined copies (Law), those which have been compared with the originals. -- Exemplified copies, those which are attested under seal of a court. -- Certified ∨ Office copies, those which are made or attested by officers having charge of the originals, and authorized to give copies officially. Abbot. Syn. -- Imitation; transcript; duplicate; counterfeit.

Copy

Cop"y , v. t. [imp. & p.p. Copied ; p.pr. & vb.n. Copying.] [Cf. F. copir, fr. LL. copiare. See Copy, n.] 1. To make a copy or copies of; to write; print, engrave, or paint after an original; to duplicate; to reproduce; to transcribe; as, to copy a manuscript, inscription, design, painting, etc.; -- often with out, sometimes with off.
I like the work well; ere it be demanded (As like enough it will), I'd have it copied.
Let this be copied out, And keep it safe for our remembrance.
2. To imitate; to attempt to resemble, as in manners or course of life.
We copy instinctively the voices of our companions, their accents, and their modes of pronunciation.

Copy

Cop"y, v. i. 1. To make a copy or copies; to imitate. 2. To yield a duplicate or transcript; as, the letter did not copy well.
Some . . . never fail, when they copy, to follow the bad as well as the good things.

An abundance or plenty of anything.

To make a copy or copies of; to write; print, engrave, or paint after an original; to duplicate; to reproduce; to transcribe; as, to copy a manuscript, inscription, design, painting, etc.; -- often with out, sometimes with off.

To make a copy or copies; to imitate.

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Usage Examples

It was an amazing mistake to lose 10p on every copy because your sleeve is so expensive.

I look at Jagger and the like and if I see a good attitude I'll admire it but I wouldn't copy their style.

I grew up doing all that stuff because I was obsessed with the '50s. I had sock hops for birthday parties. So I've always done The Twist and stuff. It was pretty natural and, with my parents doing it all the time, I'd just copy them. Not very pretty.

Microsoft has had two goals in the last 10 years. One was to copy the Mac, and the other was to copy Lotus' success in the spreadsheet - basically, the applications business. And over the course of the last 10 years, Microsoft accomplished both of those goals. And now they are completely lost.

Every time I copy something, I can draw it for the rest of my life. But research is so painful - I mean just opening up a magazine looking for a picture of a car or looking out the window looking for a car is just hard!

It is quite annoying that we have to change the sound we invented just to avoid sounding like people who simply copy us, but... it is flattering and of course challenging.

I didn't try to copy my dad or fit into the pressure or the mold that everybody tried to make me fit into.

As the true object of education is not to render the pupil the mere copy of his preceptor, it is rather to be rejoiced in, than lamented, that various reading should lead him into new trains of thinking.

Good copy can't be written with tongue in cheek, written just for a living. You've got to believe in the product.

Misspelled Form

copy, xcopy, dcopy, fcopy, vcopy, copy, xopy, dopy, fopy, vopy, opy, cxopy, cdopy, cfopy, cvopy, c opy, ciopy, c9opy, c0opy, cpopy, clopy, cipy, c9py, c0py, cppy, clpy, coipy, co9py, co0py, coppy, colpy, coopy, co0py, colpy, cooy, co0y, coly, copoy, cop0y, coply, copty, cop6y, cop7y, copuy, cophy, copt, cop6, cop7, copu, coph, copyt, copy6, copy7, copyu, copyh.

Other Usage Examples

The difference between a bad artist and a good one is: the bad artist seems to copy a great deal the good one really does.

It is all very well to copy what one sees, but it is far better to draw what one now only sees in one's memory. That is a transformation in which imagination collaborates with memory.

Reading a hard copy book, and reading a book on an iPad are slightly different experiences. What they both have in common though is that you must engage your imagination in the process.

Knowledge is what we get when an observer, preferably a scientifically trained observer, provides us with a copy of reality that we can all recognize.

Life is pretty simple: You do some stuff. Most fails. Some works. You do more of what works. If it works big, others quickly copy it. Then you do something else. The trick is the doing something else.

Except in very narrow cases, where there's breakthrough science that needs patent production, worrying about competitors is a waste of time. If you can't out iterate someone who is trying to copy you, you're toast anyway.

I never leaf through a copy of National Geographic without realizing how lucky we are to live in a society where it is traditional to wear clothes.

Success is dangerous. One begins to copy oneself, and to copy oneself is more dangerous than to copy others. It leads to sterility.

In everything truth surpasses the imitation and copy.

I put the copy of 'A Christmas Carol' that my grandfather had first read to me 60 years ago on my desk, and I began to write. The result, for better or for worse, is the 'Christmas Spirits.' I plan to read it to my grandson.

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