compose

[com┬Ěpose]

To compose is to put something together, like a song, poem, or even yourself. You might want to compose yourself before returning to the party after a good cry.

...

To form by putting together two or more things or parts; to put together; to make up; to fashion.

Verb
draw up the plans or basic details for; "frame a policy"

Verb
put together out of existing material; "compile a list"

Verb
produce a literary work; "She composed a poem"; "He wrote four novels"

Verb
write music; "Beethoven composed nine symphonies"

Verb
calm (someone, especially oneself); make quiet; "She had to compose herself before she could reply to this terrible insult"

...

Verb
form the substance of; "Greed and ambition composed his personality"


v. t.
To form by putting together two or more things or parts; to put together; to make up; to fashion.

v. t.
To form the substance of, or part of the substance of; to constitute.

v. t.
To construct by mental labor; to design and execute, or put together, in a manner involving the adaptation of forms of expression to ideas, or to the laws of harmony or proportion; as, to compose a sentence, a sermon, a symphony, or a picture.

v. t.
To dispose in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition; to adjust; to regulate.

v. t.
To free from agitation or disturbance; to tranquilize; to soothe; to calm; to quiet.

v. t.
To arrange (types) in a composing stick in order for printing; to set (type).

v. i.
To come to terms.


Compose

Com*pose" , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Composed ; p. pr. & vb. n. Composing.] [F. composer; com- + poser to place. The sense is that of L. componere, but the prigin is different. See Pose, v. t.] 1. To form by putting together two or more things or parts; to put together; to make up; to fashion.
Zeal ought to be composed of the hidhest degrees of all pious affection.
2. To form the substance of, or part of the substance of; to constitute.
Their borrowed gold composed The calf in Oreb.
A few useful things . . . compose their intellectual possessions.
3. To construct by mental labor; to design and execute, or put together, in a manner involving the adaptation of forms of expression to ideas, or to the laws of harmony or proportion; as, to compose a sentence, a sermon, a symphony, or a picture.
Let me compose Something in verse as well as prose.
The genius that composed such works as the "Standard" and "Last Supper".
4. To dispose in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition; to adjust; to regulate.
In a peaceful grave my corpse compose.
How in safety best we may Compose our present evils.
5. To free from agitation or disturbance; to tranquilize; to soothe; to calm; to quiet.
Compose thy mind; Nor frauds are here contrived, nor force designed.
6. (Print.) To arrange (types) in a composing stick in order for printing; to set (type).

Compose

Com*pose", v. i. To come to terms. [Obs.] Shak.

To form by putting together two or more things or parts; to put together; to make up; to fashion.

To come to terms.

...

Usage Examples

I did not compose my work as one might put on a church vestment... rather it sprung from the truly fervent faith of my heart, such as I have felt it since my childhood.

Writing is a form of therapy sometimes I wonder how all those who do not write, compose or paint can manage to escape the madness, melancholia, the panic and fear which is inherent in a human situation.

Misspelled Form

compose, xcompose, dcompose, fcompose, vcompose, compose, xompose, dompose, fompose, vompose, ompose, cxompose, cdompose, cfompose, cvompose, c ompose, ciompose, c9ompose, c0ompose, cpompose, clompose, cimpose, c9mpose, c0mpose, cpmpose, clmpose, coimpose, co9mpose, co0mpose, copmpose, colmpose, conmpose, cojmpose, cokmpose, co,mpose, co mpose, conpose, cojpose, cokpose, co,pose, co pose, comnpose, comjpose, comkpose, com,pose, com pose, comopose, com0pose, comlpose, comoose, com0ose, comlose, compoose, comp0ose, complose, compiose, comp9ose, comp0ose, comppose, complose, compise, comp9se, comp0se, comppse, complse, compoise, compo9se, compo0se, compopse, compolse, compoase, compowse, compoese, compodse, compoxse, compozse, compoae, compowe, compoee, compode, compoxe, compoze, composae, composwe, composee, composde, composxe, composze, composwe, compos3e, compos4e, composre, composse, composde, composw, compos3, compos4, composr, composs, composd, composew, compose3, compose4, composer, composes, composed.

Other Usage Examples

The U.S. will ignore the opinion of the Iraqi people and it will compose the new government according to its own desires.

For it is the duty of an astronomer to compose the history of the celestial motions through careful and expert study.

With the help of modern technology, I can compose intricate keyboard parts and then I have to go back and learn them in order to perform them properly.

Comments


Browse Dictionary