charter

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[Char┬Ěter]

What do rock gods do when they travel? They charter their own plane, of course. Charter means you rent or lease a particular service or object. Anyone can charter something, though lesser mortals tend to limit themselves to buses.

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A written evidence in due form of things done or granted, contracts made, etc., between man and man; a deed, or conveyance.

Noun
a document incorporating an institution and specifying its rights; includes the articles of incorporation and the certificate of incorporation

Noun
a contract to hire or lease transportation

Verb
engage for service under a term of contract; "We took an apartment on a quiet street"; "Let''s rent a car"; "Shall we take a guide in Rome?"

Verb
grant a charter to

Verb
hold under a lease or rental agreement; of goods and services

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n.
A written evidence in due form of things done or granted, contracts made, etc., between man and man; a deed, or conveyance.

n.
An instrument in writing, from the sovereign power of a state or country, executed in due form, bestowing rights, franchises, or privileges.

n.
An act of a legislative body creating a municipal or other corporation and defining its powers and privileges. Also, an instrument in writing from the constituted authorities of an order or society (as the Freemasons), creating a lodge and defining its powers.

n.
A special privilege, immunity, or exemption.

n.
The letting or hiring a vessel by special contract, or the contract or instrument whereby a vessel is hired or let; as, a ship is offered for sale or charter. See Charter party, below.

v. t.
To establish by charter.

v. t.
To hire or let by charter, as a ship. See Charter party, under Charter, n.


Charter

Char"ter , n. [OF. chartre, F. chartre, charte, fr. L. chartula a little paper, dim. of charta. See Chart, Card.] 1. A written evidence in due form of things done or granted, contracts made, etc., between man and man; a deed, or conveyance. [Archaic] 2. An instrument in writing, from the sovereign power of a state or country, executed in due form, bestowing rights, franchises, or privileges.
The king [John, a.d. 1215], with a facility somewhat suspicious, signed and sealed the charter which was required of him. This famous deed, commonly called the "Great Charter," either granted or secured very important liberties and privileges to every order of men in the kingdom.
3. An act of a legislative body creating a municipal or other corporation and defining its powers and privileges. Also, an instrument in writing from the constituted authorities of an order or society (as the Freemasons), creating a lodge and defining its powers. 4. A special privilege, immunity, or exemption.
My mother, Who has a charter to extol her blood, When she does praise me, grieves me.
5. (Com.) The letting or hiring a vessel by special contract, or the contract or instrument whereby a vessel is hired or let; as, a ship is offered for sale or charter. See Charter party, below. Charter land (O. Eng. Law), land held by charter, or in socage; bookland. -- Charter member, one of the original members of a society or corporation, esp. one named in a charter, or taking part in the first proceedings under it. -- Charter party [F. chartre partie, or charte partie, a divided charter; from the practice of cutting the instrument of contract in two, and giving one part to each of the contractors] (Com.), a mercantile lease of a vessel; a specific contract by which the owners of a vessel let the entire vessel, or some principal part of the vessel, to another person, to be used by the latter in transportation for his own account, either under their charge or his. -- People's Charter (Eng. Hist.), the document which embodied the demands made by the Chartists, so called, upon the English government in 1838.

Charter

Char"ter, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Chartered ; p. pr. & vb. n. Chartering.] 1. To establish by charter. 2. To hire or let by charter, as a ship. See Charter party, under Charter, n.

A written evidence in due form of things done or granted, contracts made, etc., between man and man; a deed, or conveyance.

To establish by charter.

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Usage Examples

The single outstanding exception was the broad yet precise mandate communicated by the General Assembly in 1946 to prepare as soon as possible the Charter of Human Rights which the San Francisco Conference had not had the time or the courage to draw up.

I believe public education is the new civil rights battle and I support charter schools.

About half my work in education is U.S. political reform around school districts and charter schools, and creating more room for entrepreneurial organizations to develop. And about half on technology, which I look at as a global platform.

You look at public education system, charter schools, infrastructure, in so many ways New Orleans has come back stronger.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

I'm not only a lawyer, I have a post doctorate degree in federal tax law from William and Mary. I work in serious scholarship and work in the United States federal tax court. My husband and I raised five kids. We've raised 23 foster children. We've applied ourselves to education reform. We started a charter school for at-risk kids.

Humanistic values of equality and equal rights for all nations and individuals as crystallized in the principles of the United Nations Charter are mankind's great achievements in the 20th century.

The facts are plain: Religious leaders who preside over marriage ceremonies must and will be guided by what they believe. If they do not wish to celebrate marriages for same-sex couples, that is their right. The Supreme Court says so. And the Charter says so.

Zionism was originally a rebellion against religious Judaism and the PLO Charter was essentially secularist. But because the conflict was allowed to fester without a resolution, religion got sucked into the escalating cycle of violence and became part of the problem.

Science is properly more scrupulous than dogma. Dogma gives a charter to mistake, but the very breath of science is a contest with mistake, and must keep the conscience alive.

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