castle

[cas┬Ětle]

A castle is a huge, grand home where a king or queen might live. Almost all castles are also fortified against attacks by enemy armies.

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A fortified residence, especially that of a prince or nobleman; a fortress.

Noun
interchanging the positions of the king and a rook

Noun
a large building formerly occupied by a ruler and fortified against attack

Noun
(chess) the piece that can move any number of unoccupied squares in a direction parallel to the sides of the chessboard

Noun
a large and stately mansion

Verb
move the king two squares toward a rook and in the same move the rook to the square next past the king

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n.
A fortified residence, especially that of a prince or nobleman; a fortress.

n.
Any strong, imposing, and stately mansion.

n.
A small tower, as on a ship, or an elephant's back.

n.
A piece, made to represent a castle, used in the game of chess; a rook.

v. i.
To move the castle to the square next to king, and then the king around the castle to the square next beyond it, for the purpose of covering the king.


Castle

Cas"tle , n. [AS. castel, fr. L. castellum, dim. of castrum a fortified place, castle.] 1. A fortified residence, especially that of a prince or nobleman; a fortress.
The house of every one is to him castle and fortress, as well for his defense againts injury and violence, as for his repose.
Our castle's strength Will laugh a siege to scorn.
&hand; Originally the medi'91val castle was a single strong tower or keep, with a palisaded inclosure around it and inferior buidings, such as stables and the like, and surrounded by a moat; then such a keep or donjon, with courtyards or baileys and accessory buildings of greater elaboration a great hall and a chapel, all surrounded by defensive walls and a moat, with a drawbridge, etc. Afterwards the name was retained by large dwellings that had formerly been fortresses, or by those which replaced ancient fortresses. A Donjon or Keep, an irregular building containing the dwelling of the lord and his family; B C Large round towers ferming part of the donjon and of the exterior; D Square tower, separating the two inner courts and forming part of the donjon; E Chapel, whose apse forms a half-round tower, F, on the exterior walls; G H Round towers on the exterior walls; K Postern gate, reached from outside by a removable fight of steps or inclined plane for hoisting in stores, and leading to a court, L (see small digagram) whose pavement is on a level with the sill of the postern, but below the level of the larger court, with which it communicates by a separately fortified gateway; M Turret, containing spiral stairway to all the stories of the great tower, B, and serving also as a station for signal fire, banner, etc.; N Turret with stairway for tower, C; O Echauguettes; P P P Battlemants consisting of merlons and crenels alternately, the merlons being pierced by loopholes; Q Q Machicolations (those at Q defend the postern K); R Outwork defending the approach, which is a road ascending the hill and passing under all four faces of the castle; S S Wall of the outer bailey. The road of approach enters the bailey at T and passes thence into the castle by the main entrance gateway (which is in the wall between, and defended by the towers, C H) and over two drawbridges and through fortified passages to the inner court. 2. Any strong, imposing, and stately mansion. 3. A small tower, as on a ship, or an elephant's back. 4. A piece, made to represent a castle, used in the game of chess; a rook. Castle in the air, a visionary project; a baseless scheme; an air castle; -- sometimes called a castle in Spain (F. Ch'83teau en Espagne). Syn. -- Fortress; fortification; citadel; stronghold. See Fortress.

Castle

Cas"tle , v. i. [imp. & p. p. Castled . p. pr. & vb. n. Castling .] (Chess) To move the castle to the square next to king, and then the king around the castle to the square next beyond it, for the purpose of covering the king.

A fortified residence, especially that of a prince or nobleman; a fortress.

To move the castle to the square next to king, and then the king around the castle to the square next beyond it, for the purpose of covering the king.

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Usage Examples

What I really tried to do with Helen was make her show this sad side of her. She was married off at 16, was so young and living in this castle that can't leave because of how she looks, and married to a man she hates and three times her age.

Simply by not owning three medium-sized castles in Tuscany I have saved enough money in the last forty years on insurance premiums alone to buy a medium-sized castle in Tuscany.

There are no rules of architecture for a castle in the clouds.

I'm constantly pitching one episode where we see life through Castle's eyes. I think Castle's just a little off as far as his perception goes. A very, very clever man, but I want to see the world as Castle sees it - kind of a rose-colored glasses, all the women find him irresistible, all the guys find him super cool and do whatever he says.

The kitchen really is the castle itself. This is where we spend our happiest moments and where we find the joy of being a family.

Misspelled Form

castle, xcastle, dcastle, fcastle, vcastle, castle, xastle, dastle, fastle, vastle, astle, cxastle, cdastle, cfastle, cvastle, c astle, cqastle, cwastle, csastle, czastle, cqstle, cwstle, csstle, czstle, caqstle, cawstle, casstle, cazstle, caastle, cawstle, caestle, cadstle, caxstle, cazstle, caatle, cawtle, caetle, cadtle, caxtle, caztle, casatle, caswtle, casetle, casdtle, casxtle, casztle, casrtle, cas5tle, cas6tle, casytle, casgtle, casrle, cas5le, cas6le, casyle, casgle, castrle, cast5le, cast6le, castyle, castgle, castkle, castole, castple, cast:le, castke, castoe, castpe, cast:e, castlke, castloe, castlpe, castl:e, castlwe, castl3e, castl4e, castlre, castlse, castlde, castlw, castl3, castl4, castlr, castls, castld, castlew, castle3, castle4, castler, castles, castled.

Other Usage Examples

A man's house is his castle.

A man's home is his wife's castle.

The home to everyone is to him his castle and fortress, as well for his defence against injury and violence, as for his repose.

A man's home may seem to be his castle on the outside inside is more often his nursery.

Most sailing ships take what they call trainees, who pay to be part of the crew. The Picton Castle takes people who are absolutely raw recruits. But you can't just ride along. You're learning to steer the ship, navigation you're pulling lines, keeping a lookout in the galley you're cooking.

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