bound

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[bound]

To bound is to jump or hop usually as you run. Bound can also mean to go or to plan to go, especially to a certain destination, as in being bound for New York or homeward bound.

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The external or limiting line, either real or imaginary, of any object or space; that which limits or restrains, or within which something is limited or restrained; limit; confine; extent; boundary.

Noun
a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Noun
the line or plane indicating the limit or extent of something

Noun
a line determining the limits of an area

Verb
place limits on (extent or access); "restrict the use of this parking lot"; "limit the time you can spend with your friends"

Verb
spring back; spring away from an impact; "The rubber ball bounced"; "These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide"

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Verb
move forward by leaps and bounds; "The horse bounded across the meadow"; "The child leapt across the puddle"; "Can you jump over the fence?"

Verb
form the boundary of; be contiguous to

Adjective
confined by bonds; "bound and gagged hostages"

Adjective
secured with a cover or binding; often used as a combining form; "bound volumes"; "leather-bound volumes"

Adjective
held with another element, substance or material in chemical or physical union

Adjective S.
bound by contract

Adjective S.
headed or intending to head in a certain direction; often used as a combining form as in `college-bound students''; "children bound for school"; "a flight destined for New York"

Adjective S.
covered or wrapped with a bandage; "the bandaged wound on the back of his head"; "an injury bound in fresh gauze"

Adjective S.
bound by an oath; "a bound official"


imp.
of Bind

p. p.
of Bind

n.
The external or limiting line, either real or imaginary, of any object or space; that which limits or restrains, or within which something is limited or restrained; limit; confine; extent; boundary.

v. t.
To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; -- said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine.

v. t.
To name the boundaries of; as, to bound France.

v. i.
To move with a sudden spring or leap, or with a succession of springs or leaps; as the beast bounded from his den; the herd bounded across the plain.

v. i.
To rebound, as an elastic ball.

v. t.
To make to bound or leap; as, to bound a horse.

v. t.
To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; as, to bound a ball on the floor.

n.
A leap; an elastic spring; a jump.

n.
Rebound; as, the bound of a ball.

n.
Spring from one foot to the other.


imp. & p. p. of Bind.

p. p. & a.
Restrained by a hand, rope, chain, fetters, or the like.

p. p. & a.
Inclosed in a binding or cover; as, a bound volume.

p. p. & a.
Under legal or moral restraint or obligation.

p. p. & a.
Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; -- followed by the infinitive; as, he is bound to succeed; he is bound to fail.

p. p. & a.
Resolved; as, I am bound to do it.

p. p. & a.
Constipated; costive.

v.
Ready or intending to go; on the way toward; going; -- with to or for, or with an adverb of motion; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz.


Bound

Bound , n. [OE. bounde, bunne, OF. bonne, bonde, bodne, F. borne, fr. LL. bodina, bodena, bonna; prob. of Celtic origin; cf. Arm. bonn boundary, limit, and boden, bod, a tuft or cluster of trees, by which a boundary or limit could be marked. Cf. Bourne.] The external or limiting line, either real or imaginary, of any object or space; that which limits or restrains, or within which something is limited or restrained; limit; confine; extent; boundary.
He hath compassed the waters with bounds.
On earth's remotest bounds.
And mete the bounds of hate and love.
To keep within bounds, not to exceed or pass beyond assigned limits; to act with propriety or discretion. Syn. -- See Boundary.

Bound

Bound, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bounded; p. pr. & vb. n. Bounding.] 1. To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; -- said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine.
Where full measure only bounds excess.
Phlegethon . . . Whose fiery flood the burning empire bounds.
2. To name the boundaries of; as, to bound France.

Bound

Bound, v. i. [F. bondir to leap, OF. bondir, bundir, to leap, resound, fr. L. bombitare to buzz, hum, fr. bombus a humming, buzzing. See Bomb.] 1. To move with a sudden spring or leap, or with a succession of springs or leaps; as the beast bounded from his den; the herd bounded across the plain.
Before his lord the ready spaniel bounds.
And the waves bound beneath me as a steed That knows his rider.
2. To rebound, as an elastic ball.

Bound

Bound, v. t. 1. To make to bound or leap; as, to bound a horse. [R.] Shak. 2. To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; as, to bound a ball on the floor. [Collog.]

Bound

Bound, n. 1. A leap; an elastic spring; a jump.
A bound of graceful hardihood.
2. Rebound; as, the bound of a ball. Johnson. 3. (Dancing) Spring from one foot to the other.

Bound

Bound, imp. & p. p. of Bind.

Bound

Bound, p. p. & a. 1. Restrained by a hand, rope, chain, fetters, or the like. 2. Inclosed in a binding or cover; as, a bound volume. 3. Under legal or moral restraint or obligation. 4. Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; -- followed by the infinitive; as, he is bound to succeed; he is bound to fail. 5. Resolved; as, I am bound to do it. [Collog. U. S.] 6. Constipated; costive. &hand; Used also in composition; as, icebound, windbound, hidebound, etc. Bound bailiff (Eng. Law), a sheriff's officer who serves writs, makes arrests, etc. The sheriff being answerable for the bailiff's misdemeanors, the bailiff is usually under bond for the faithful discharge of his trust. -- Bound up in, entirely devoted to; inseparable from.

Bound

Bound, a. [Past p. of OE. bounen to prepare, fr. boun ready, prepared, fr. Icel. b'81inn, p. p. of b'81a to dwell, prepare; akin to E. boor and bower. See Bond, a., and cf. Busk, v.] Ready or intending to go; on the way toward; going; -- with to or for, or with an adverb of motion; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz. "The mariner bound homeward." Cowper.

The external or limiting line, either real or imaginary, of any object or space; that which limits or restrains, or within which something is limited or restrained; limit; confine; extent; boundary.

To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; -- said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine.

To move with a sudden spring or leap, or with a succession of springs or leaps; as the beast bounded from his den; the herd bounded across the plain.

To make to bound or leap; as, to bound a horse.

A leap; an elastic spring; a jump.

imp. & p. p. of Bind.

Restrained by a hand, rope, chain, fetters, or the like.

Ready or intending to go; on the way toward; going; -- with to or for, or with an adverb of motion; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz.

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Usage Examples

And often it would be a woman who was in her 70s or 80s who would win the beauty contest, because bound feet never age.

I am bound to add that the excess in too little has ever proved in me more dangerous than the excess in too much the last may cause indigestion, but the first causes death.

A company is stronger if it is bound by love rather than by fear.

Charity never humiliated him who profited from it, nor ever bound him by the chains of gratitude, since it was not to him but to God that the gift was made.

A universe with a God would look quite different from a universe without one. A physics, a biology where there is a God is bound to look different. So the most basic claims of religion are scientific. Religion is a scientific theory.

As someone who worked hard for a Labour victory in the 90s, do I regret it? Not really. It was bound to happen. And it'll happen with the next government, and the one after it. Because all governments serve us. They serve the filth.

Above all things let us never forget that mankind constitutes one great brotherhood all born to encounter suffering and sorrow, and therefore bound to sympathize with each other.

Every true genius is bound to be naive.

Misspelled Form

bound, vbound, gbound, hbound, nbound, bound, vound, gound, hound, nound, ound, bvound, bgound, bhound, bnound, b ound, biound, b9ound, b0ound, bpound, blound, biund, b9und, b0und, bpund, blund, boiund, bo9und, bo0und, bopund, bolund, boyund, bo7und, bo8und, boiund, bojund, boynd, bo7nd, bo8nd, boind, bojnd, bouynd, bou7nd, bou8nd, bouind, boujnd, boubnd, bouhnd, boujnd, boumnd, bou nd, boubd, bouhd, boujd, boumd, bou d, bounbd, bounhd, bounjd, bounmd, boun d, bounsd, bouned, bounfd, bounxd, bouncd, bouns, boune, bounf, bounx, bounc, bounds, bounde, boundf, boundx, boundc.

Other Usage Examples

Anyone who acquires more than the usual amount of knowledge concerning a subject is bound to leave it as his contribution to the knowledge of the world.

I refuse to accept the view that mankind is so tragically bound to the starless midnight of racism and war that the bright daybreak of peace and brotherhood can never become a reality... I believe that unarmed truth and unconditional love will have the final word.

I shall never be a heretic I may err in dispute, but I do not wish to decide anything finally on the other hand, I am not bound by the opinions of men.

I am not bound for any public place, but for ground of my own where I have planted vines and orchard trees, and in the heat of the day climbed up into the healing shadow of the woods.

As a black woman, my politics and political affiliation are bound up with and flow from participation in my people's struggle for liberation, and with the fight of oppressed people all over the world against American imperialism.

Half of the secular unrest and dismal, profane sadness of modern society comes from the vain ideas that every man is bound to be a critic for life.

After all, it is hard to master both life and work equally well. So if you are bound to fake one of them, it had better be life.

Chum was a British boy's weekly which, at the end of the year was bound into a single huge book and the following Christmas parents bought it as Christmas presents for male children.

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