book

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[book]

The sacred writings of the Christian religions

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A collection of sheets of paper, or similar material, blank, written, or printed, bound together; commonly, many folded and bound sheets containing continuous printing or writing.

Noun
physical objects consisting of a number of pages bound together; "he used a large book as a doorstop"

Noun
a number of sheets (ticket or stamps etc.) bound together on one edge; "he bought a book of stamps"

Noun
a major division of a long written composition; "the book of Isaiah"

Noun
a written work or composition that has been published (printed on pages bound together); "I am reading a good book on economics"

Noun
the sacred writings of the Christian religions; "he went to carry the Word to the heathen"

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Noun
the sacred writings of Islam revealed by God to the prophet Muhammad during his life at Mecca and Medina

Noun
a compilation of the known facts regarding something or someone; "Al Smith used to say, `Let''s look at the record''"; "his name is in all the recordbooks"

Noun
a written version of a play or other dramatic composition; used in preparing for a performance

Noun
a collection of rules or prescribed standards on the basis of which decisions are made; "they run things by the book around here"

Noun
a record in which commercial accounts are recorded; "they got a subpoena to examine our books"

Verb
engage for a performance; "Her agent had booked her for several concerts in Tokyo"

Verb
record a charge in a police register; "The policeman booked her when she tried to solicit a man"

Verb
arrange for and reserve (something for someone else) in advance; "reserve me a seat on a flight"; "The agent booked tickets to the show for the whole family"; "please hold a table at Maxim''s"

Verb
register in a hotel booker


n.
A collection of sheets of paper, or similar material, blank, written, or printed, bound together; commonly, many folded and bound sheets containing continuous printing or writing.

n.
A composition, written or printed; a treatise.

n.
A part or subdivision of a treatise or literary work; as, the tenth book of "Paradise Lost."

n.
A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, etc.

n.
Six tricks taken by one side, in the game of whist; in certain other games, two or more corresponding cards, forming a set.

v. t.
To enter, write, or register in a book or list.

v. t.
To enter the name of (any one) in a book for the purpose of securing a passage, conveyance, or seat; as, to be booked for Southampton; to book a seat in a theater.

v. t.
To mark out for; to destine or assign for; as, he is booked for the valedictory.


Book

Book , n. [OE. book, bok, AS. bc; akin to Goth. bka a letter, in pl. book, writing, Icel. bk, Sw. bok, Dan. bog, OS. bk, D. boek, OHG. puoh, G. buch; and fr. AS. bc, bce, beech; because the ancient Saxons and Germans in general wrote runes on pieces of beechen board. Cf. Beech.] 1. A collection of sheets of paper, or similar material, blank, written, or printed, bound together; commonly, many folded and bound sheets containing continuous printing or writing. &hand; When blank, it is called a blank book. When printed, the term often distinguishes a bound volume, or a volume of some size, from a pamphlet. &hand; It has been held that, under the copyright law, a book is not necessarily a volume made of many sheets bound together; it may be printed on a single sheet, as music or a diagram of patterns. Abbott. 2. A composition, written or printed; a treatise.
A good book is the precious life blood of a master spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life.
3. A part or subdivision of a treatise or literary work; as, the tenth book of "Paradise Lost." 4. A volume or collection of sheets in which accounts are kept; a register of debts and credits, receipts and expenditures, etc. 5. Six tricks taken by one side, in the game of whist; in certain other games, two or more corresponding cards, forming a set. &hand; Book is used adjectively or as a part of many compounds; as, book buyer, bookrack, book club, book lore, book sale, book trade, memorandum book, cashbook. Book account, an account or register of debt or credit in a book. -- Book debt, a debt for items charged to the debtor by the creditor in his book of accounts. -- Book learning, learning acquired from books, as distinguished from practical knowledge. "Neither does it so much require book learning and scholarship, as good natural sense, to distinguish true and false." Burnet. -- Book louse (Zo'94l.), one of several species of minute, wingless insects injurious to books and papers. They belong to the Pseudoneuroptera. -- Book moth (Zo'94l.), the name of several species of moths, the larv'91 of which eat books. -- Book oath, an oath made on The Book, or Bible. -- The Book of Books, the Bible. -- Book post, a system under which books, bulky manuscripts, etc., may be transmitted by mail. -- Book scorpion (Zo'94l.), one of the false scorpions (Chelifer cancroides) found among books and papers. It can run sidewise and backward, and feeds on small insects. -- Book stall, a stand or stall, often in the open air, for retailing books. -- Canonical books. See Canonical. -- In one's books, in one's favor. "I was so much in his books, that at his decease he left me his lamp." Addison. -- To bring to book. (a) To compel to give an account. (b) To compare with an admitted authority. "To bring it manifestly to book is impossible." M. Arnold. -- To course by bell, book, and candle. See under Bell. -- To make a book (Horse Racing), to lay bets (recorded in a pocket book) against the success of every horse, so that the bookmaker wins on all the unsuccessful horses and loses only on the winning horse or horses. -- To speak by the book, to speak with minute exactness. -- Without book. (a) By memory. (b) Without authority.

Book

Book, v. t. [imp & p. p. Booked ; p. pr. & vb. n. Booking.] 1. To enter, write, or register in a book or list.
Let it be booked with the rest of this day's deeds.
2. To enter the name of (any one) in a book for the purpose of securing a passage, conveyance, or seat; as, to be booked for Southampton; to book a seat in a theater. 3. To mark out for; to destine or assign for; as, he is booked for the valedictory. [Colloq.]
Here I am booked for three days more in Paris.

A collection of sheets of paper, or similar material, blank, written, or printed, bound together; commonly, many folded and bound sheets containing continuous printing or writing.

To enter, write, or register in a book or list.

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Usage Examples

A truly great book should be read in youth, again in maturity and once more in old age, as a fine building should be seen by morning light, at noon and by moonlight.

A book is sent out into the world, and there is no way of fully anticipating the responses it will elicit. Consider the responses called forth by the Bible, Homer, Shakespeare - let alone contemporary poetry or a modern novel.

'Blind Curve,' the book I'm working on now, sprang from a crazy incident that happened to me last year while on my book tour. I was pulled out of my car for a minor traffic violation - an incident that escalated into my being thrown into cuffs and told I was going to jail. Except in my story, the hero doesn't get off as easily as I did.

Actors are agents of change. A film, a piece of theater, a piece of music, or a book can make a difference. It can change the world.

All literature consists of whatever the writer thinks is cool. The reader will like the book to the degree that he agrees with the writer about what's cool.

A book is the only place in which you can examine a fragile thought without breaking it, or explore an explosive idea without fear it will go off in your face. It is one of the few havens remaining where a man's mind can get both provocation and privacy.

A man's got to take a lot of punishment to write a really funny book.

A truly good book teaches me better than to read it. I must soon lay it down, and commence living on its hint. What I began by reading, I must finish by acting.

Misspelled Form

book, vbook, gbook, hbook, nbook, book, vook, gook, hook, nook, ook, bvook, bgook, bhook, bnook, b ook, biook, b9ook, b0ook, bpook, blook, biok, b9ok, b0ok, bpok, blok, boiok, bo9ok, bo0ok, bopok, bolok, boiok, bo9ok, bo0ok, bopok, bolok, boik, bo9k, bo0k, bopk, bolk, booik, boo9k, boo0k, boopk, boolk, boojk, booik, boook, boolk, boomk, booj, booi, booo, bool, boom, bookj, booki, booko, bookl, bookm.

Other Usage Examples

A book is good company. It is full of conversation without loquacity. It comes to your longing with full instruction, but pursues you never.

A bad book is as much of a labor to write as a good one, it comes as sincerely from the author's soul.

A book has got smell. A new book smells great. An old book smells even better. An old book smells like ancient Egypt.

A great book provides escapism for me. The artistry and the creativity in a story are better than any drugs.

A book is a fragile creature, it suffers the wear of time, it fears rodents, the elements and clumsy hands. so the librarian protects the books not only against mankind but also against nature and devotes his life to this war with the forces of oblivion.

A bad book is the worse that it cannot repent. It has not been the devil's policy to keep the masses of mankind in ignorance but finding that they will read, he is doing all in his power to poison their books.

After I left the convent, for 15 years I was worn out with religion, I wanted nothing whatever to do with it. I felt disgusted with it. If I saw someone reading a religious book on a train, I'd think, how awful.

A travel book is about someone who goes somewhere, travels on the ground, sees something and spends quite a lot of time doing it, and has a hard time, and then comes back and writes about it. It's not about inventing.

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