bite

...
[Bite]

To grip, cut off, or tear with or as if with the teeth or jaws

...

To seize with the teeth, so that they enter or nip the thing seized; to lacerate, crush, or wound with the teeth; as, to bite an apple; to bite a crust; the dog bit a man.

Noun
a portion removed from the whole; "the government''s weekly bite from my paycheck"

Noun
the act of gripping or chewing off with the teeth and jaws

Noun
a strong odor or taste property; "the pungency of mustard"; "the sulfurous bite of garlic"; "the sharpness of strange spices"

Noun
wit having a sharp and caustic quality; "he commented with typical pungency"; "the bite of satire"

Noun
(angling) an instance of a fish taking the bait; "after fishing for an hour he still had not had a bite"

...

Noun
a light informal meal

Noun
a small amount of solid food; a mouthful; "all they had left was a bit of bread"

Noun
a wound resulting from biting by an animal or a person

Noun
a painful wound caused by the thrust of an insect''s stinger into skin

Verb
penetrate or cut, as with a knife; "The fork bit into the surface"

Verb
deliver a sting to; "A bee stung my arm yesterday"

Verb
to grip, cut off, or tear with or as if with the teeth or jaws; "Gunny invariably tried to bite her"

Verb
cause a sharp or stinging pain or discomfort; "The sun burned his face"


v. t.
To seize with the teeth, so that they enter or nip the thing seized; to lacerate, crush, or wound with the teeth; as, to bite an apple; to bite a crust; the dog bit a man.

v. t.
To puncture, abrade, or sting with an organ (of some insects) used in taking food.

v. t.
To cause sharp pain, or smarting, to; to hurt or injure, in a literal or a figurative sense; as, pepper bites the mouth.

v. t.
To cheat; to trick; to take in.

v. t.
To take hold of; to hold fast; to adhere to; as, the anchor bites the ground.

v. i.
To seize something forcibly with the teeth; to wound with the teeth; to have the habit of so doing; as, does the dog bite?

v. i.
To cause a smarting sensation; to have a property which causes such a sensation; to be pungent; as, it bites like pepper or mustard.

v. i.
To cause sharp pain; to produce anguish; to hurt or injure; to have the property of so doing.

v. i.
To take a bait into the mouth, as a fish does; hence, to take a tempting offer.

v. i.
To take or keep a firm hold; as, the anchor bites.

v.
The act of seizing with the teeth or mouth; the act of wounding or separating with the teeth or mouth; a seizure with the teeth or mouth, as of a bait; as, to give anything a hard bite.

v.
The act of puncturing or abrading with an organ for taking food, as is done by some insects.

v.
The wound made by biting; as, the pain of a dog's or snake's bite; the bite of a mosquito.

v.
A morsel; as much as is taken at once by biting.

v.
The hold which the short end of a lever has upon the thing to be lifted, or the hold which one part of a machine has upon another.

v.
A cheat; a trick; a fraud.

v.
A sharper; one who cheats.

v.
A blank on the edge or corner of a page, owing to a portion of the frisket, or something else, intervening between the type and paper.


Bite

Bite , v. t. [imp. Bit ; p. p. Bitten , Bit; p. pr. & vb. n. Biting.] [OE. biten, AS. b'c6tan; akin to D. bijten, OS. b'c6tan, OHG. b'c6zan, G. beissen, Goth. beitan, Icel. b'c6ta, Sw. bita, Dan. bide, L. findere to cleave, Skr. bhid to cleave. &root;87. Cf. Fissure.] 1. To seize with the teeth, so that they enter or nip the thing seized; to lacerate, crush, or wound with the teeth; as, to bite an apple; to bite a crust; the dog bit a man.
Such smiling rogues as these, Like rats, oft bite the holy cords atwain.
2. To puncture, abrade, or sting with an organ (of some insects) used in taking food. 3. To cause sharp pain, or smarting, to; to hurt or injure, in a literal or a figurative sense; as, pepper bites the mouth. "Frosts do bite the meads." Shak. 4. To cheat; to trick; to take in. [Colloq.] Pope. 5. To take hold of; to hold fast; to adhere to; as, the anchor bites the ground.
The last screw of the rack having been turned so often that its purchase crumbled, . . . it turned and turned with nothing to bite.
To bite the dust, To bite the ground, to fall in the agonies of death; as, he made his enemy bite the dust. -- To bite in (Etching), to corrode or eat into metallic plates by means of an acid. -- To bite the thumb at (any one), formerly a mark of contempt, designed to provoke a quarrel; to defy. "Do you bite your thumb at us ?" Shak. -- To bite the tongue, to keep silence. Shak.

Bite

Bite , v. i. 1. To seize something forcibly with the teeth; to wound with the teeth; to have the habit of so doing; as, does the dog bite? 2. To cause a smarting sensation; to have a property which causes such a sensation; to be pungent; as, it bites like pepper or mustard. 3. To cause sharp pain; to produce anguish; to hurt or injure; to have the property of so doing.
At the last it [wine] biteth like serpent, and stingeth like an adder.
4. To take a bait into the mouth, as a fish does; hence, to take a tempting offer. 5. To take or keep a firm hold; as, the anchor bites.

Bite

Bite, n. [OE. bite, bit, bitt, AS. bite bite, fr. b'c6tan to bite, akin to Icel. bit, OS. biti, G. biss. See Bite, v., and cf. Bit.] 1. The act of seizing with the teeth or mouth; the act of wounding or separating with the teeth or mouth; a seizure with the teeth or mouth, as of a bait; as, to give anything a hard bite.
I have known a very good fisher angle diligently four or six hours for a river carp, and not have a bite.
2. The act of puncturing or abrading with an organ for taking food, as is done by some insects. 3. The wound made by biting; as, the pain of a dog's or snake's bite; the bite of a mosquito. 4. A morsel; as much as is taken at once by biting. 5. The hold which the short end of a lever has upon the thing to be lifted, or the hold which one part of a machine has upon another. 6. A cheat; a trick; a fraud. [Colloq.]
The baser methods of getting money by fraud and bite, by deceiving and overreaching.
7. A sharper; one who cheats. [Slang] Johnson. 8. (Print.) A blank on the edge or corner of a page, owing to a portion of the frisket, or something else, intervening between the type and paper.

To seize with the teeth, so that they enter or nip the thing seized; to lacerate, crush, or wound with the teeth; as, to bite an apple; to bite a crust; the dog bit a man.

To seize something forcibly with the teeth; to wound with the teeth; to have the habit of so doing; as, does the dog bite?

The act of seizing with the teeth or mouth; the act of wounding or separating with the teeth or mouth; a seizure with the teeth or mouth, as of a bait; as, to give anything a hard bite.

...

Usage Examples

In business, the competition will bite you if you keep running, if you stand still, they will swallow you.

I think I'm drawn to more villain-type characters, because it's so cool to get to say all the things you want to say. In Hollywood, you get to this position where you have to bite your tongue so much. You take all your experiences of not being able to say what you really want to say, and channel that through your character.

I try to eat in a way that makes me feel good. If that means a little bite of chocolate I do that, but I try not to use food as a reward for myself.

It only looks like I get to eat a lot of food on TV. I really just get the one bite and the crew and guests eat everything else.

I don't do yoga. I bite the hella outta my nails. I smoke, I eat all the wrong food, I don't exercise.

If you're out, and starving, and need a bite to eat, then you need fast food.

I do eat well. I try to love my body. That is what I tell my daughter. I say, 'Love every bite of food. Love your body. We're all going to be dead soon.' Actually I don't say that last thing to her.

You know, you can touch a stick of dynamite, but if you touch a venomous snake it'll turn around and bite you and kill you so fast it's not even funny.

With a lot of hair and make-up then I'm possibly, remotely attractive. But it's rare, I don't think I'm ugly but I'm nothing particularly special. I'm not a yoga and health girl. I don't exercise that much and I eat crap and smoke and bite my nails.

Misspelled Form

bite, vbite, gbite, hbite, nbite, bite, vite, gite, hite, nite, ite, bvite, bgite, bhite, bnite, b ite, buite, b8ite, b9ite, boite, bjite, bkite, bute, b8te, b9te, bote, bjte, bkte, biute, bi8te, bi9te, biote, bijte, bikte, birte, bi5te, bi6te, biyte, bigte, bire, bi5e, bi6e, biye, bige, bitre, bit5e, bit6e, bitye, bitge, bitwe, bit3e, bit4e, bitre, bitse, bitde, bitw, bit3, bit4, bitr, bits, bitd, bitew, bite3, bite4, biter, bites, bited.

Other Usage Examples

I like spending time at home. In Paris, people drop by and have a bite to eat, or they drop by and watch Friends on TV. I take my dog to the office there, and I walk to work sometimes.

It's kind of interesting, because hacking is a skill that could be used for criminal purposes or legitimate purposes, and so even though in the past I was hacking for the curiosity, and the thrill, to get a bite of the forbidden fruit of knowledge, I'm now working in the security field as a public speaker.

It is not unprofessional to give free legal advice, but advertising that the first visit will be free is a bit like a fox telling chickens he will not bite them until they cross the threshold of the hen house.

People who keep dogs are cowards who haven't got the guts to bite people themselves.

If I were asked for a one-sentence sound bite on religion, I would say I was against it.

Mankind is like dogs, not gods - as long as you don't get mad they'll bite you - but stay mad and you'll never be bitten. Dogs don't respect humility and sorrow.

Success sometimes can really bite you in the shorts.

He bit his lip in a manner which immediately awakened my maternal sympathy, and I helped him bite it.

Truth has rough flavours if we bite it through.

Comments


Browse Dictionary