become

[be┬Ěcome]

To become is to evolve, change into, or emerge as something. A fertilized egg will hatch and the tiny chick will become a full grown chicken.

...

To pass from one state to another; to enter into some state or condition, by a change from another state, or by assuming or receiving new properties or qualities, additional matter, or a new character.

Verb
enter or assume a certain state or condition; "He became annoyed when he heard the bad news"; "It must be getting more serious"; "her face went red with anger"; "She went into ecstasy"; "Get going!"

Verb
come into existence; "What becomes has duration"

Verb
undergo a change or development; "The water turned into ice"; "Her former friend became her worst enemy"; "He turned traitor"

Verb
enhance the appearance of; "Mourning becomes Electra"; "This behavior doesn''t suit you!"


p. p.
of Become

v. i.
To pass from one state to another; to enter into some state or condition, by a change from another state, or by assuming or receiving new properties or qualities, additional matter, or a new character.

v. i.
To come; to get.

v. t.
To suit or be suitable to; to be congruous with; to befit; to accord with, in character or circumstances; to be worthy of, or proper for; to cause to appear well; -- said of persons and things.


Become

Be*come" , v. i. [imp. Became ; p. p. Become; p. pr. & vb. n. Becoming.] [OE. bicumen, becumen, AS. becuman to come to, to happen; akin to D. bekomen, OHG.a piqu'89man, Goth. biquiman to come upon, G. bekommen to get, suit. See Be-, and Come.] 1. To pass from one state to another; to enter into some state or condition, by a change from another state, or by assuming or receiving new properties or qualities, additional matter, or a new character.
The Lord God . . . breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul.
That error now which is become my crime.
2. To come; to get. [Obs.]
But, madam, where is Warwick then become!
To become of, to be the present state or place of; to be the fate of; to be the end of; to be the final or subsequent condition of.
What is then become of so huge a multitude?

Become

Be*come", v. t. To suit or be suitable to; to be congruous with; to befit; to accord with, in character or circumstances; to be worthy of, or proper for; to cause to appear well; -- said of persons and things.
It becomes me so to speak of so excellent a poet.
I have known persons so anxious to have their dress become them, as to convert it, at length, into their proper self, and thus actually to become the dress.

To pass from one state to another; to enter into some state or condition, by a change from another state, or by assuming or receiving new properties or qualities, additional matter, or a new character.

To suit or be suitable to; to be congruous with; to befit; to accord with, in character or circumstances; to be worthy of, or proper for; to cause to appear well; -- said of persons and things.

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Usage Examples

A verbal art like poetry is reflective it stops to think. Music is immediate, it goes on to become.

A dream doesn't become reality through magic it takes sweat, determination and hard work.

A ball player has to be kept hungry to become a big leaguer. That's why no boy from a rich family has ever made the big leagues.

A person is a fool to become a writer. His only compensation is absolute freedom.

A dream is your creative vision for your life in the future. You must break out of your current comfort zone and become comfortable with the unfamiliar and the unknown.

A knowledge of the forces that rule society, of the causes that have produced its upheavals, and of society's resources for promoting healthy progress has become of vital concern to our civilization.

A kiss is a lovely trick designed by nature to stop speech when words become superfluous.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

A father may turn his back on his child, brothers and sisters may become inveterate enemies, husbands may desert their wives, wives their husbands. But a mother's love endures through all.

'Men have forgotten this truth,' said the fox. 'But you must not forget it. You become responsible, forever, for what you have tamed.'

A politician will do anything to keep his job - even become a patriot.

A lot of victims, for example, have become addicted to alcohol and drugs. It seems to me that the church's healing ministry is going to be enhanced through this in much broader strokes. That's good, it's all positive.

A realist, in Venice, would become a romantic by mere faithfulness to what he saw before him.

'Snow White' is an old fairy tale, so obviously the idea of vanity and obsession with youth is long-standing. With today's science, people have become crazy with trying to move their face around. It's bizarre.

A work can become modern only if it is first postmodern. Postmodernism thus understood is not modernism at its end but in the nascent state, and this state is constant.

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