arrive

[ar┬Ěrive]

To arrive is to come to a destination. When you arrive in Paris, the first thing you should do is go and buy a croissant.

...

To come to the shore or bank. In present usage: To come in progress by water, or by traveling on land; to reach by water or by land; -- followed by at (formerly sometimes by to), also by in and from.

Verb
reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress; "She arrived home at 7 o''clock"; "She didn''t get to Chicago until after midnight"

Verb
succeed in a big way; get to the top; "After he published his book, he had arrived"; "I don''t know whether I can make it in science!"; "You will go far, my boy!"


v. i.
To come to the shore or bank. In present usage: To come in progress by water, or by traveling on land; to reach by water or by land; -- followed by at (formerly sometimes by to), also by in and from.

v. i.
To reach a point by progressive motion; to gain or compass an object by effort, practice, study, inquiry, reasoning, or experiment.

v. i.
To come; said of time; as, the time arrived.

v. i.
To happen or occur.

v. t.
To bring to shore.

v. t.
To reach; to come to.

n.
Arrival.


Arrive

Ar*rive" , v. i. [imp. & p. p. Arrived ; p. pr. & vb. n. Arriving.] [OE. ariven to arrive, land, OF. ariver, F. arriver, fr. LL. arripare, adripare, to come to shore; L. ad + ripa the shore or sloping bank of a river. Cf. Riparian.] 1. To come to the shore or bank. In present usage: To come in progress by water, or by traveling on land; to reach by water or by land; -- followed by at (formerly sometimes by to), also by in and from. "Arrived in Padua." Shak.
['92neas] sailing with a fleet from Sicily, arrived . . . and landed in the country of Laurentum.
There was no outbreak till the regiment arrived at Ipswich.
2. To reach a point by progressive motion; to gain or compass an object by effort, practice, study, inquiry, reasoning, or experiment. To arrive at, or attain to.
When he arrived at manhood.
We arrive at knowledge of a law of nature by the generalization of facts.
If at great things thou wouldst arrive.
3. To come; said of time; as, the time arrived. 4. To happen or occur. [Archaic]
Happy! to whom this glorious death arrives.

Arrive

Ar*rive", v. t. 1. To bring to shore. [Obs.]
And made the sea-trod ship arrive them.
2. To reach; to come to. [Archaic]
Ere he arrive the happy isle.
Ere we could arrive the point proposed.
Arrive at last the blessed goal.

Arrive

Ar*rive", n. Arrival. [Obs.] Chaucer.
How should I joy of thy arrive to hear!

To come to the shore or bank. In present usage: To come in progress by water, or by traveling on land; to reach by water or by land; -- followed by at (formerly sometimes by to), also by in and from.

To bring to shore.

Arrival.

...

Usage Examples

It is unthinkable for a Frenchman to arrive at middle age without having syphilis and the Cross of the Legion of Honor.

In grade school I was taught that the United States is a melting pot. People from all over the world come here for freedom and to pursue a better life. They arrive with next to nothing, work incredibly hard, learn a new language and new customs, and in a generation they become an integral part of our amazing nation.

I am Jose Mourinho and I don't change. I arrive with all my qualities and my defects.

I'm not on the run from anything and I'm not at all clear about what I'm running towards. But as some great writer put it, I want to be certain that when I arrive at death, I'm totally exhausted.

Happiness is not a state to arrive at, but a manner of traveling.

Introspection and preserved writings give us far more insight into the ways of past humans than we have into the ways of past dinosaurs. For that reason, I'm optimistic that we can eventually arrive at convincing explanations for these broadest patterns of human history.

Love recognizes no barriers. It jumps hurdles, leaps fences, penetrates walls to arrive at its destination full of hope.

Adam knew Eve his wife and she conceived. It is a pity that this is still the only knowledge of their wives at which some men seem to arrive.

It was an honor and privilege to arrive to this country 16 years ago with almost no money in my pocket. A lot has happened since then.

Misspelled Form

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Other Usage Examples

I want to arrive at the possibility of peace with the Syrians, and when I believe that the conditions are right, I will not miss the opportunity.

Ambition is the path to success, persistence is the vehicle you arrive in.

Ambition is the path to success. Persistence is the vehicle you arrive in.

It is better to travel well than to arrive.

Christmas to a child is the first terrible proof that to travel hopefully is better than to arrive.

I have a character failing. I am quite incapable of identifying with anything whole-heartedly. Whatever I am doing, I am always planning to do something else. I would rather travel than arrive.

I love to travel, but hate to arrive.

However great an evil immorality may be, we must not forget that it is not without its beneficial consequences. It is only through extremes that men can arrive at the middle path of wisdom and virtue.

At school, there was an annual school disco and I'd be standing in my bedroom wondering what to wear for hours on end. Eventually I'd arrive at a decision that was just the most ridiculous costume you could have ever devised - I think it was probably knitted Christmas jumpers on top of buttoned-up white shirts.

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