action

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[Ac┬Ětion]

An action is a thing that is done, and not merely thought or spoken about. Possible actions could range from blinking to invading a country.

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A process or condition of acting or moving, as opposed to rest; the doing of something; exertion of power or force, as when one body acts on another; the effect of power exerted on one body by another; agency; activity; operation; as, the action of heat; a man of action.

Noun
something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"

Noun
the most important or interesting work or activity in a specific area or field; "the action is no longer in technology stocks but in municipal bonds"; "gawkers always try to get as close to the action as possible"

Noun
a military engagement; "he saw action in Korea"

Noun
a judicial proceeding brought by one party against another; one party prosecutes another for a wrong done or for protection of a right or for prevention of a wrong

Noun
an act by a government body or supranational organization; "recent federal action undermined the segregationist position"; "the United Nations must have the power to propose and organize action without being hobbled by irrelevant issues"; "the Union actio

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Noun
the operating part that transmits power to a mechanism; "the piano had a very stiff action"

Noun
the trait of being active and energetic and forceful; "a man of action"

Noun
the series of events that form a plot; "his novels always have a lot of action"

Noun
a process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings); "the action of natural forces"; "volcanic activity"

Noun
the state of being active; "his sphere of activity"; "he is out of action"

Verb
put in effect; "carry out a task"; "execute the decision of the people"; "He actioned the operation"

Verb
institute legal proceedings against; file a suit against; "He was warned that the district attorney would process him"; "She actioned the company for discrimination"


n.
A process or condition of acting or moving, as opposed to rest; the doing of something; exertion of power or force, as when one body acts on another; the effect of power exerted on one body by another; agency; activity; operation; as, the action of heat; a man of action.

n.
An act; a thing done; a deed; an enterprise. (pl.): Habitual deeds; hence, conduct; behavior; demeanor.

n.
The event or connected series of events, either real or imaginary, forming the subject of a play, poem, or other composition; the unfolding of the drama of events.

n.
Movement; as, the horse has a spirited action.

n.
Effective motion; also, mechanism; as, the breech action of a gun.

n.
Any one of the active processes going on in an organism; the performance of a function; as, the action of the heart, the muscles, or the gastric juice.

n.
Gesticulation; the external deportment of the speaker, or the suiting of his attitude, voice, gestures, and countenance, to the subject, or to the feelings.

n.
The attitude or position of the several parts of the body as expressive of the sentiment or passion depicted.

n.
A suit or process, by which a demand is made of a right in a court of justice; in a broad sense, a judicial proceeding for the enforcement or protection of a right, the redress or prevention of a wrong, or the punishment of a public offense.

n.
A right of action; as, the law gives an action for every claim.

n.
A share in the capital stock of a joint-stock company, or in the public funds; hence, in the plural, equivalent to stocks.

n.
An engagement between troops in war, whether on land or water; a battle; a fight; as, a general action, a partial action.

n.
The mechanical contrivance by means of which the impulse of the player's finger is transmitted to the strings of a pianoforte or to the valve of an organ pipe.


Action

Ac"tion , n. [OF. action, L. actio, fr. agere to do. See Act.] 1. A process or condition of acting or moving, as opposed to rest; the doing of something; exertion of power or force, as when one body acts on another; the effect of power exerted on one body by another; agency; activity; operation; as, the action of heat; a man of action.
One wise in council, one in action brave.
2. An act; a thing done; a deed; an enterprise. (pl.): Habitual deeds; hence, conduct; behavior; demeanor.
The Lord is a Good of knowledge, and by him actions are weighed.
3. The event or connected series of events, either real or imaginary, forming the subject of a play, poem, or other composition; the unfolding of the drama of events. 4. Movement; as, the horse has a spirited action. 5. (Mech.) Effective motion; also, mechanism; as, the breech action of a gun. 6. (Physiol.) Any one of the active processes going on in an organism; the performance of a function; as, the action of the heart, the muscles, or the gastric juice. 7. (Orat.) Gesticulation; the external deportment of the speaker, or the suiting of his attitude, voice, gestures, and countenance, to the subject, or to the feelings. 8. (Paint. & Sculp.) The attitude or position of the several parts of the body as expressive of the sentiment or passion depicted. 9. (Law) (a) A suit or process, by which a demand is made of a right in a court of justice; in a broad sense, a judicial proceeding for the enforcement or protection of a right, the redress or prevention of a wrong, or the punishment of a public offense. (b) A right of action; as, the law gives an action for every claim. 10. (Com.)A share in the capital stock of a joint-stock company, or in the public funds; hence, in the plural, equivalent to stocks. [A Gallicism] [Obs.]
The Euripus of funds and actions.
11. An engagement between troops in war, whether on land or water; a battle; a fight; as, a general action, a partial action. 12. (Music) The mechanical contrivance by means of which the impulse of the player's finger is transmitted to the strings of a pianoforte or to the valve of an organ pipe. Grove. Chose in action. (Law) See Chose. -- Quantity of action (Physics), the product of the mass of a body by the space it runs through, and its velocity. Syn. -- Action, Act. In many cases action and act are synonymous; but some distinction is observable. Action involves the mode or process of acting, and is usually viewed as occupying some time in doing. Act has more reference to the effect, or the operation as complete.
To poke the fire is an act, to reconcile friends who have quarreled is a praiseworthy action.

A process or condition of acting or moving, as opposed to rest; the doing of something; exertion of power or force, as when one body acts on another; the effect of power exerted on one body by another; agency; activity; operation; as, the action of heat; a man of action.

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Usage Examples

Action and reaction, ebb and flow, trial and error, change - this is the rhythm of living. Out of our over-confidence, fear out of our fear, clearer vision, fresh hope. And out of hope, progress.

A good education is that which prepares us for our future sphere of action and makes us contented with that situation in life in which God, in his infinite mercy, has seen fit to place us, to be perfectly resigned to our lot in life, whatever it may be.

A commitment to human rights cannot be fostered simply through the transmission of knowledge. Action and experience play a crucial role in the learning process.

A life which does not go into action is a failure.

Action and faith enslave thought, both of them in order not be troubled or inconvenienced by reflection, criticism, and doubt.

Action is a great restorer and builder of confidence. Inaction is not only the result, but the cause, of fear. Perhaps the action you take will be successful perhaps different action or adjustments will have to follow. But any action is better than no action at all.

Misspelled Form

action, qaction, waction, saction, zaction, qction, wction, sction, zction, aqction, awction, asction, azction, axction, adction, afction, avction, a ction, axtion, adtion, aftion, avtion, a tion, acxtion, acdtion, acftion, acvtion, ac tion, acrtion, ac5tion, ac6tion, acytion, acgtion, acrion, ac5ion, ac6ion, acyion, acgion, actrion, act5ion, act6ion, actyion, actgion, actuion, act8ion, act9ion, actoion, actjion, actkion, actuon, act8on, act9on, actoon, actjon, actkon, actiuon, acti8on, acti9on, actioon, actijon, actikon, actiion, acti9on, acti0on, actipon, actilon, actiin, acti9n, acti0n, actipn, actiln, actioin, actio9n, actio0n, actiopn, actioln, actiobn, actiohn, actiojn, actiomn, actio n, actiob, actioh, actioj, actiom, actio , actionb, actionh, actionj, actionm, action .

Other Usage Examples

Action cures fear, inaction creates terror.

Action conquers fear.

'A Guide To Recognizing Your Saints' was the first real actor-actor part I did, and I hope I to do more. Action movies are fun, but I'd be happy not to do them if there are better roles.

According to Richard Clarke, the former White House counterterrorism chief, Bush was so obsessed with Iraq that he failed to take action against Osama Bin Laden despite repeated warnings from his intelligence experts.

A lot of action movies today seem to have scenes that just lead up to the action.

A lot of people just go to movies that feed into their preexisting and not so noble needs and desires: They just go to action pictures, and things like that.

'Immortals' is all action. I love action movies. That's really where I want to spearhead my career.

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