sphere

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[sphere]

Marbles, oranges, bubbles, and beach balls all of these objects illustrate the shape of a sphere, or globe (unless the beach balls are under inflated, in which case they’re sort of a “squished sphere” shape).

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A body or space contained under a single surface, which in every part is equally distant from a point within called its center.

Noun
any spherically shaped artifact

Noun
a particular aspect of life or activity; "he was helpless in an important sector of his life"

Noun
the apparent surface of the imaginary sphere on which celestial bodies appear to be projected

Noun
the geographical area in which one nation is very influential

Noun
a three-dimensional closed surface such that every point on the surface is equidistant from the center

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Noun
a solid figure bounded by a spherical surface (including the space it encloses)

Noun
a particular environment or walk of life; "his social sphere is limited"; "it was a closed area of employment"; "he''s out of my orbit"


n.
A body or space contained under a single surface, which in every part is equally distant from a point within called its center.

n.
Hence, any globe or globular body, especially a celestial one, as the sun, a planet, or the earth.

n.
The apparent surface of the heavens, which is assumed to be spherical and everywhere equally distant, in which the heavenly bodies appear to have their places, and on which the various astronomical circles, as of right ascension and declination, the equator, ecliptic, etc., are conceived to be drawn; an ideal geometrical sphere, with the astronomical and geographical circles in their proper positions on it.

n.
In ancient astronomy, one of the concentric and eccentric revolving spherical transparent shells in which the stars, sun, planets, and moon were supposed to be set, and by which they were carried, in such a manner as to produce their apparent motions.

n.
The extension of a general conception, or the totality of the individuals or species to which it may be applied.

n.
Circuit or range of action, knowledge, or influence; compass; province; employment; place of existence.

n.
Rank; order of society; social positions.

n.
An orbit, as of a star; a socket.

v. t.
To place in a sphere, or among the spheres; to insphere.

v. t.
To form into roundness; to make spherical, or spheral; to perfect.


Sphere

Sphere , n. [OE. spere, OF. espere, F. sph'8are, L. sphaera,. Gr. a sphere, a ball.] 1. (Geom.) A body or space contained under a single surface, which in every part is equally distant from a point within called its center. 2. Hence, any globe or globular body, especially a celestial one, as the sun, a planet, or the earth.
Of celestial bodies, first the sun, A mighty sphere, he framed.
3. (Astron.) (a) The apparent surface of the heavens, which is assumed to be spherical and everywhere equally distant, in which the heavenly bodies appear to have their places, and on which the various astronomical circles, as of right ascension and declination, the equator, ecliptic, etc., are conceived to be drawn; an ideal geometrical sphere, with the astronomical and geographical circles in their proper positions on it. (b) In ancient astronomy, one of the concentric and eccentric revolving spherical transparent shells in which the stars, sun, planets, and moon were supposed to be set, and by which they were carried, in such a manner as to produce their apparent motions. 4. (Logic) The extension of a general conception, or the totality of the individuals or species to which it may be applied. 5. Circuit or range of action, knowledge, or influence; compass; province; employment; place of existence.
To be called into a huge sphere, and not to be seen to move in 't.
Taking her out of the ordinary relations with humanity, and inclosing her in a sphere by herself.
Each in his hidden sphere of joy or woe Our hermit spirits dwell.
6. Rank; order of society; social positions. 7. An orbit, as of a star; a socket. [R.] Shak. Armillary sphere, Crystalline sphere, Oblique sphere,. See under Armillary, Crystalline,. -- Doctrine of the sphere, applications of the principles of spherical trigonometry to the properties and relations of the circles of the sphere, and the problems connected with them, in astronomy and geography, as to the latitudes and longitudes, distance and bearing, of places on the earth, and the right ascension and declination, altitude and azimuth, rising and setting, etc., of the heavenly bodies; spherical geometry. -- Music of the spheres. See under Music. Syn. -- Globe; orb; circle. See Globe.

Sphere

Sphere , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sphered ; p. pr. & vb. n. Sphering.] 1. To place in a sphere, or among the spheres; to insphere.
The glorious planet Sol In noble eminence enthroned and sphered Amidst the other.
2. To form into roundness; to make spherical, or spheral; to perfect. Tennyson.

A body or space contained under a single surface, which in every part is equally distant from a point within called its center.

To place in a sphere, or among the spheres; to insphere.

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Usage Examples

In science, as in art, and, as I believe, in every other sphere of human activity, there may be wisdom in a multitude of counsellors, but it is only in one or two of them.

Everyone goes to the same exhibitions and the same parties, stays in the same handful of hotels, eats at the same no-star restaurants, and has almost the same opinions. I adore the art world, but this is copycat behavior in a sphere that prides itself on independent thinking.

IN April 1882 my father died and I was at once whirled out of my land of dreams into a very different sphere.

A good education is that which prepares us for our future sphere of action and makes us contented with that situation in life in which God, in his infinite mercy, has seen fit to place us, to be perfectly resigned to our lot in life, whatever it may be.

History tells us that America does best when the private sector is energetic and entrepreneurial and the government is attentive and engaged. Who among us, really, would, looking back, wish to edit out either sphere at the entire expense of the other?

It contributes greatly towards a man's moral and intellectual health, to be brought into habits of companionship with individuals unlike himself, who care little for his pursuits, and whose sphere and abilities he must go out of himself to appreciate.

It is in Rousseau's writing above all that history begins to turn from upper-class honour to middle-class humanitarianism. Pity, sympathy and compassion lie at the centre of his moral vision. Values associated with the feminine begin to infiltrate social existence as a whole, rather than being confined to the domestic sphere.

Misspelled Form

sphere, asphere, wsphere, esphere, dsphere, xsphere, zsphere, aphere, wphere, ephere, dphere, xphere, zphere, saphere, swphere, sephere, sdphere, sxphere, szphere, sophere, s0phere, slphere, sohere, s0here, slhere, spohere, sp0here, splhere, spghere, spyhere, spuhere, spjhere, spnhere, spgere, spyere, spuere, spjere, spnere, sphgere, sphyere, sphuere, sphjere, sphnere, sphwere, sph3ere, sph4ere, sphrere, sphsere, sphdere, sphwre, sph3re, sph4re, sphrre, sphsre, sphdre, sphewre, sphe3re, sphe4re, spherre, sphesre, sphedre, spheere, sphe4re, sphe5re, sphetre, sphefre, spheee, sphe4e, sphe5e, sphete, sphefe, spheree, spher4e, spher5e, spherte, spherfe, spherwe, spher3e, spher4e, spherre, spherse, spherde, spherw, spher3, spher4, spherr, sphers, spherd, spherew, sphere3, sphere4, spherer, spheres, sphered.

Other Usage Examples

Teaching man his relatively small sphere in the creation, it also encourages him by its lessons of the unity of Nature and shows him that his power of comprehension allies him with the great intelligence over-reaching all.

Men honor what lies within the sphere of their knowledge, but do not realize how dependent they are on what lies beyond it.

It is high time to compel man by the might of right to give woman her political, legal and social rights. She will find her own sphere in accordance with her capacities, powers and tastes and yet she will be woman still.

Nature is an infinite sphere of which the center is everywhere and the circumference nowhere.

Mysticism, poor mysticism! When it is underestimated and oversimplified, it comes down from its original sphere and stands beside religion.

Discretion is nothing other than the sense of justice with respect to the sphere of the intimate contents of life.

My own early experiences in war led me to suspect the value of discipline, even in that sphere where it is so often regarded as the first essential for success.

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