gather

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[gath·er]

Gather is a verb with a many related meanings, most involving drawing together or assembling something. You may gather your socks into the laundry bag, or you may gather your thoughts by making a list.

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To bring together; to collect, as a number of separate things, into one place, or into one aggregate body; to assemble; to muster; to congregate.

Noun
the act of gathering something

Noun
sewing consisting of small folds or puckers made by pulling tight a thread in a line of stitching

Verb
collect or gather; "Journals are accumulating in my office"; "The work keeps piling up"

Verb
conclude from evidence; "I gather you have not done your homework"

Verb
look for (food) in nature; "Our ancestors gathered nuts in the Fall"

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Verb
draw fabric together and sew it tightly

Verb
assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together"

Verb
collect in one place; "We assembled in the church basement"; "Let''s gather in the dining room"

Verb
get people together; "assemble your colleagues"; "get together all those who are interested in the project"; "gather the close family members"


v. t.
To bring together; to collect, as a number of separate things, into one place, or into one aggregate body; to assemble; to muster; to congregate.

v. t.
To pick out and bring together from among what is of less value; to collect, as a harvest; to harvest; to cull; to pick off; to pluck.

v. t.
To accumulate by collecting and saving little by little; to amass; to gain; to heap up.

v. t.
To bring closely together the parts or particles of; to contract; to compress; to bring together in folds or plaits, as a garment; also, to draw together, as a piece of cloth by a thread; to pucker; to plait; as, to gather a ruffle.

v. t.
To derive, or deduce, as an inference; to collect, as a conclusion, from circumstances that suggest, or arguments that prove; to infer; to conclude.

v. t.
To gain; to win.

v. t.
To bring together, or nearer together, in masonry, as where the width of a fireplace is rapidly diminished to the width of the flue, or the like.

v. t.
To haul in; to take up; as, to gather the slack of a rope.

v. i.
To come together; to collect; to unite; to become assembled; to congregate.

v. i.
To grow larger by accretion; to increase.

v. i.
To concentrate; to come to a head, as a sore, and generate pus; as, a boil has gathered.

v. i.
To collect or bring things together.

n.
A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing a thread through it; a pucker.

n.
The inclination forward of the axle journals to keep the wheels from working outward.

n.
The soffit or under surface of the masonry required in gathering. See Gather, v. t., 7.


Gather

Gath"er , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Gathered ; p. pr. & vb. n. Gathering.] [OE. gaderen, AS. gaderian, gadrian, fr. gador, geador, together, fr. g'91d fellowship; akin to E. good, D. gaderen to collect, G. gatte husband, MHG. gate, also companion, Goth. gadiliggs a sister's son. &root;29. See Good, and cf. Together.] 1. To bring together; to collect, as a number of separate things, into one place, or into one aggregate body; to assemble; to muster; to congregate.
And Belgium's capital had gathered them Her beauty and her chivalry.
When he had gathered all the chief priests and scribes of the people together.
2. To pick out and bring together from among what is of less value; to collect, as a harvest; to harvest; to cull; to pick off; to pluck.
A rose just gathered from the stalk.
Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles?
Gather us from among the heathen.
3. To accumulate by collecting and saving little by little; to amass; to gain; to heap up.
He that by usury and unjust gain increaseth his substance, he shall gather it for him that will pity the poor.
To pay the creditor . . . he must gather up money by degrees.
4. To bring closely together the parts or particles of; to contract; to compress; to bring together in folds or plaits, as a garment; also, to draw together, as a piece of cloth by a thread; to pucker; to plait; as, to gather a ruffle.
Gathering his flowing robe, he seemed to stand In act to speak, and graceful stretched his hand.
5. To derive, or deduce, as an inference; to collect, as a conclusion, from circumstances that suggest, or arguments that prove; to infer; to conclude.
Let me say no more Gather the sequel by that went before.
6. To gain; to win. [Obs.]
He gathers ground upon her in the chase.
7. (Arch.) To bring together, or nearer together, in masonry, as where the width of a fireplace is rapidly diminished to the width of the flue, or the like. 8. (Naut.) To haul in; to take up; as, to gather the slack of a rope. To be gathered to one's people, ∨ to one's fathers to die. Gen. xxv. 8. -- To gather breath, to recover normal breathing after being out of breath; to get breath; to rest. Spenser. -- To gather one's self together, to collect and dispose one's powers for a great effort, as a beast crouches preparatory to a leap. -- To gather way (Naut.), to begin to move; to move with increasing speed.

Gather

Gath"er , v. i. 1. To come together; to collect; to unite; to become assembled; to congregate.
When small humors gather to a gout.
Tears from the depth of some divine despair Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes.
2. To grow larger by accretion; to increase.
Their snowball did not gather as it went.
3. To concentrate; to come to a head, as a sore, and generate pus; as, a boil has gathered. 4. To collect or bring things together.
Thou knewest that I reap where I sowed not, and gather where I have not strewed.

Gather

Gath"er, n. 1. A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing a thread through it; a pucker. 2. (Carriage Making) The inclination forward of the axle journals to keep the wheels from working outward. 3. (Arch.) The soffit or under surface of the masonry required in gathering. See Gather, v. t., 7.

To bring together; to collect, as a number of separate things, into one place, or into one aggregate body; to assemble; to muster; to congregate.

To come together; to collect; to unite; to become assembled; to congregate.

A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing a thread through it; a pucker.

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Usage Examples

Another principle is, the deepest affections of our hearts gather around some human form in which are incarnated the living thoughts and ideas of the passing age.

By plucking her petals, you do not gather the beauty of the flower.

I love those who can smile in trouble, who can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but they whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves their conduct, will pursue their principles unto death.

I love the man that can smile in trouble, that can gather strength from distress, and grow brave by reflection. 'Tis the business of little minds to shrink, but he whose heart is firm, and whose conscience approves his conduct, will pursue his principles unto death.

As a medical doctor, it is my duty to evaluate the situation with as much data as I can gather and as much expertise as I have and as much experience as I have to determine whether or not the wish of the patient is medically justified.

Misspelled Form

gather, fgather, tgather, ygather, hgather, bgather, vgather, father, tather, yather, hather, bather, vather, gfather, gtather, gyather, ghather, gbather, gvather, gqather, gwather, gsather, gzather, gqther, gwther, gsther, gzther, gaqther, gawther, gasther, gazther, garther, ga5ther, ga6ther, gayther, gagther, garher, ga5her, ga6her, gayher, gagher, gatrher, gat5her, gat6her, gatyher, gatgher, gatgher, gatyher, gatuher, gatjher, gatnher, gatger, gatyer, gatuer, gatjer, gatner, gathger, gathyer, gathuer, gathjer, gathner, gathwer, gath3er, gath4er, gathrer, gathser, gathder, gathwr, gath3r, gath4r, gathrr, gathsr, gathdr, gathewr, gathe3r, gathe4r, gatherr, gathesr, gathedr, gatheer, gathe4r, gathe5r, gathetr, gathefr, gathee, gathe4, gathe5, gathet, gathef, gathere, gather4, gather5, gathert, gatherf.

Other Usage Examples

I gather from a lawyer that there was a rehearsal yesterday. We haven't a hope. I know the presiding judge too: I've had the misfortune to sleep with his wife. He was specially picked.

I strongly support the call to greatly expand our human intelligence capability to penetrate al Qaeda and gather critical intelligence to prevent terrorist attacks on our homeland.

From you we have learned what we, at least, value, to separate Church and State and from you we gather inspiration at all times in our devotion to learning, to religious liberty, and to individual and National freedom.

I never yet feared those men who set a place apart in the middle of their cities where they gather to cheat one another and swear oaths which they break.

I think the reaction to a World War II situation would be the same today as it was in 1942. Initially, people would question, but once patriotism got stirred up, the whole thing would gather momentum and we'd all pull together.

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