desire

[de┬Ěsire]

If you're talking about the longings of the heart, use the word desire. When you are studying for a difficult history exam, the desire to be somewhere far away doing something fun might be very strong!

...

To long for; to wish for earnestly; to covet.

Noun
an inclination to want things; "a man of many desires"

Noun
the feeling that accompanies an unsatisfied state

Noun
something that is desired

Verb
feel or have a desire for; want strongly; "I want to go home now"; "I want my own room"

Verb
express a desire for

...

Verb
expect and wish; "I trust you will behave better from now on"; "I hope she understands that she cannot expect a raise"


v. t.
To long for; to wish for earnestly; to covet.

v. t.
To express a wish for; to entreat; to request.

v. t.
To require; to demand; to claim.

v. t.
To miss; to regret.

v. t.
The natural longing that is excited by the enjoyment or the thought of any good, and impels to action or effort its continuance or possession; an eager wish to obtain or enjoy.

v. t.
An expressed wish; a request; petition.

v. t.
Anything which is desired; an object of longing.

v. t.
Excessive or morbid longing; lust; appetite.

v. t.
Grief; regret.


Desire

De*sire" , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Desired ; p. pr. & vb. n. Desiring.] [F. d'82sirer, L. desiderare, origin uncertain, perh. fr. de- + sidus star, constellation, and hence orig., to turn the eyes from the stars. Cf. Consider, and Desiderate, and see Sidereal.] 1. To long for; to wish for earnestly; to covet.
Neither shall any man desire thy land.
Ye desire your child to live.
2. To express a wish for; to entreat; to request.
Then she said, Did I desire a son of my lord?
Desire him to go in; trouble him no more.
3. To require; to demand; to claim. [Obs.]
A doleful case desires a doleful song.
4. To miss; to regret. [Obs.]
She shall be pleasant while she lives, and desired when she dies.
Syn. -- To long for; hanker after; covet; wish; ask; request; solicit; entreat; beg. -- To Desire, Wish. In desire the feeling is usually more eager than in wish. "I wish you to do this" is a milder form of command than "I desire you to do this," though the feeling prompting the injunction may be the susage> C. J. Smith.

Desire

De*sire", n. [F. d'82sir, fr. d'82sirer. See Desire, v. t.] 1. The natural longing that is excited by the enjoyment or the thought of any good, and impels to action or effort its continuance or possession; an eager wish to obtain or enjoy.
Unspeakable desire to see and know.
2. An expressed wish; a request; petition.
And slowly was my mother brought To yield consent to my desire.
3. Anything which is desired; an object of longing.
The Desire of all nations shall come.
4. Excessive or morbid longing; lust; appetite. 5. Grief; regret. [Obs.] Chapman. Syn. -- Wish; appetency; craving; inclination; eagerness; aspiration; longing.

To long for; to wish for earnestly; to covet.

The natural longing that is excited by the enjoyment or the thought of any good, and impels to action or effort its continuance or possession; an eager wish to obtain or enjoy.

...

Usage Examples

'Tis very certain the desire of life prolongs it.

A person who has sympathy for mankind in the lump, faith in its future progress, and desire to serve the great cause of this progress, should be called not a humanist, but a humanitarian, and his creed may be designated as humanitarianism.

A great many men's gratitude is nothing but a secret desire to hook in more valuable kindnesses hereafter.

All people desire what they believe will make them happy. If a person is not full of desire for God, we can only conclude that he is engaged with another happiness.

A desire to be in charge of our own lives, a need for control, is born in each of us. It is essential to our mental health, and our success, that we take control.

All men by nature desire knowledge.

A life is either all spiritual or not spiritual at all. No man can serve two masters. Your life is shaped by the end you live for. You are made in the image of what you desire.

Misspelled Form

desire, sdesire, edesire, fdesire, xdesire, cdesire, sesire, eesire, fesire, xesire, cesire, dsesire, deesire, dfesire, dxesire, dcesire, dwesire, d3esire, d4esire, dresire, dsesire, ddesire, dwsire, d3sire, d4sire, drsire, dssire, ddsire, dewsire, de3sire, de4sire, dersire, dessire, dedsire, deasire, dewsire, deesire, dedsire, dexsire, dezsire, deaire, dewire, deeire, dedire, dexire, dezire, desaire, deswire, deseire, desdire, desxire, deszire, desuire, des8ire, des9ire, desoire, desjire, deskire, desure, des8re, des9re, desore, desjre, deskre, desiure, desi8re, desi9re, desiore, desijre, desikre, desiere, desi4re, desi5re, desitre, desifre, desiee, desi4e, desi5e, desite, desife, desiree, desir4e, desir5e, desirte, desirfe, desirwe, desir3e, desir4e, desirre, desirse, desirde, desirw, desir3, desir4, desirr, desirs, desird, desirew, desire3, desire4, desirer, desires, desired.

Other Usage Examples

A creative man is motivated by the desire to achieve, not by the desire to beat others.

All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsions, habit, reason, passion, desire.

A desire to resist oppression is implanted in the nature of man.

A desire arises in the mind. It is satisfied immediately another comes. In the interval which separates two desires a perfect calm reigns in the mind. It is at this moment freed from all thought, love or hate. Complete peace equally reigns between two mental waves.

A teacher who is attempting to teach without inspiring the pupil with a desire to learn is hammering on cold iron.

All teenagers have this desire to somehow run away.

A psychologist once told me that for a boy being in the middle of a conflict between two women is the worst possible situation. There's always a desire to please each one.

Comments


Browse Dictionary